Japan

This is our lounge area. Feel free to come in and get acquainted!
User avatar
Anaxagoras
Posts: 28059
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:45 am
Location: Yokohama/Tokyo, Japan

Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

ed wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:18 am Japanese Culture and Offence Question ...

It seems that in spite of my retired state, I am about to do business with Japan military and/or their agents.

Question: Is it acceptable to ask if there have been any Godzilla attacks? I just came close to asking but I thought it best to refrain and get some top notch advice from ex-pat yanks whose loyalty is suspect and who would not steer a fellow american wrong, not even for massive lulz.

Thank you.
Gosh, probably not ipso facto, but it sort of depends on the situation and how familiar you are with the person you are dealing with.

In a business transaction, Japanese people don't generally crack a lot of jokes in my experience. If they are the buyer and you are the seller, they might not appreciate it. The business culture here is such that there is an assumed hierarchy between the customer and the seller, where the customer is given great deference by the seller and spoken to in only the most polite tone of language. In such a context, making a joke might not come across as having the right tone, depending on the person. However, they know that you are not Japanese and they probably don't expect a gaijin to know about Japanese business etiquette. They might even be amused. But it's hard to say especially if you don't know the person. If all you've done is exchanged an e-mail or two purely about a business transaction, then making jokes might seem a little overly bold.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare
User avatar
Doctor X
Posts: 72897
Joined: Fri Jun 04, 2004 8:09 pm
Title: Collective Messiah
Location: Your Mom

Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

Best to be on the best behavior.

If they take you out to drink you can joke a bit. Otherwise, they appreciate the formality. Have a business card.

Do not stick their business cards in your ass.

Do not ask about the tentacles.

– J.D.
Mob of the Mean: Free beanie, cattle-prod and Charley Fan Club!
"Doctor X is just treating you the way he treats everyone--as subhuman crap too dumb to breathe in after you breathe out." – Don
DocX: FTW. – sparks
"Doctor X wins again." – Pyrrho
"Never sorry to make a racist Fucktard cry." – His Humble MagNIfIcence
"It was the criticisms of Doc X, actually, that let me see more clearly how far the hypocrisy had gone." – clarsct
"I'd leave it up to Doctor X who has been a benevolent tyrant so far." – Grammatron
"Indeed you are a river to your people.
Shit. That's going to end up in your sig." – Pyrrho
"Try a twelve step program and accept Doctor X as your High Power." – asthmatic camel
"just like Doc X said." – gnome

ImageWS CHAMPIONS X4!!!! ImageNBA CHAMPIONS!! Stanley Cup!Image SB CHAMPIONS X6!!!!!! Image
shuize
Posts: 3120
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:32 am

Re: Japan

Post by shuize »

ed wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:18 am Japanese Culture and Offence Question ...

It seems that in spite of my retired state, I am about to do business with Japan military and/or their agents.

Question: Is it acceptable to ask if there have been any Godzilla attacks? I just came close to asking but I thought it best to refrain and get some top notch advice from ex-pat yanks whose loyalty is suspect and who would not steer a fellow american wrong, not even for massive lulz.

Thank you.

Japanese military, you say?

If you are all in America, you can break the ice by asking them "Hey, how does it feel to have lost so badly against a nation of lazy fat asses?"

Or, "When is your pussy government finally going to sack up and amend that 'no war' constitution?"

Or, "Hey, I'm not sure if I can do business with you, I only work with real 'armies' not 'self-defense' posers."

Then say, "Ha. Ha. Just kidding. My friend Anax of Yokohama, said you'd appreciate the humor."
User avatar
Anaxagoras
Posts: 28059
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:45 am
Location: Yokohama/Tokyo, Japan

Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

No, no, no. If you really want to impress your Japanese customer tell him that your friend Shuize from Osaka wants to know why they call an anime body pillow "Mai Waifu" in Japan. This is considered the height of humor in Japanese culture.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare
User avatar
ed
Posts: 39099
Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2004 11:52 pm
Title: G_D

Re: Japan

Post by ed »

Thank you.

I am not disappointed.
About that stereo
shuize
Posts: 3120
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:32 am

Re: Japan

Post by shuize »

Anaxagoras wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 10:52 am No, no, no. If you really want to impress your Japanese customer tell him that your friend Shuize from Osaka wants to know why they call an anime body pillow "Mai Waifu" in Japan. This is considered the height of humor in Japanese culture.

Yes, shuize is unfamiliar with that. How is it Anax already seems to know the secret? (Ha! Ha!)

But, while we're on the subject, I am curious why Japanese people insist on using the very awkward English "my [everything]" even when speaking Japanese. For example "my home", "my wife", "my number" identification card, etc.

Don't listen to Doctor X. Ask the Japanese military guys if they call it "my tentacle porn." As in, "Is this your my tentacle?"
User avatar
ed
Posts: 39099
Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2004 11:52 pm
Title: G_D

Re: Japan

Post by ed »

shuize wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 6:04 pm
Anaxagoras wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 10:52 am No, no, no. If you really want to impress your Japanese customer tell him that your friend Shuize from Osaka wants to know why they call an anime body pillow "Mai Waifu" in Japan. This is considered the height of humor in Japanese culture.

Yes, shuize is unfamiliar with that. How is it Anax already seems to know the secret? (Ha! Ha!)

But, while we're on the subject, I am curious why Japanese people insist on using the very awkward English "my [everything]" even when speaking Japanese. For example "my home", "my wife", "my number" identification card, etc.

Don't listen to Doctor X. Ask the Japanese military guys if they call it "my tentacle porn." As in, "Is this your my tentacle?"
As I recall, that was the fatal mistake that the residents of Nanking made back in the day.
About that stereo
User avatar
Witness
Posts: 30260
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Japan

Post by Witness »

Ainu group's fishing lawsuit is first to seek confirmation of indigenous rights

Image

Sapporo – A group of Ainu, an ethnic minority in northern Japan, filed a lawsuit Monday against authorities to grant them an exemption from a ban on the commercial fishing of salmon in rivers.

While the law stipulates that the Ainu are an indigenous people, it does not guarantee their self-determination and other tribal rights, with the government citing there are no Ainu tribes.

The suit, filed with the Sapporo District Court against the central and Hokkaido governments, is the first such lawsuit by Ainu people to confirm their indigenous rights.

Salmon fishing in rivers is illegal under the law on the protection of fishery resources and Hokkaido’s regulations on inland fishing. The Ainu living inland can only fish salmon for traditional fishing and must request permission from the governor.

According to the lawsuit, the plaintiffs are members of an Ainu cultural preservation body based in the town of Urahoro. The group includes descendants of Ainu communities who had lived around the Tokachi River in Hokkaido since the Edo Period that began in the 17th century.
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2020/ ... us-rights/
shuize
Posts: 3120
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:32 am

Re: Japan

Post by shuize »

Witness wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 10:18 pm
Ainu group's fishing lawsuit is first to seek confirmation of indigenous rights

Image

Sapporo – A group of Ainu, an ethnic minority in northern Japan, filed a lawsuit Monday against authorities to grant them an exemption from a ban on the commercial fishing of salmon in rivers.

While the law stipulates that the Ainu are an indigenous people, it does not guarantee their self-determination and other tribal rights, with the government citing there are no Ainu tribes.

The suit, filed with the Sapporo District Court against the central and Hokkaido governments, is the first such lawsuit by Ainu people to confirm their indigenous rights.

Salmon fishing in rivers is illegal under the law on the protection of fishery resources and Hokkaido’s regulations on inland fishing. The Ainu living inland can only fish salmon for traditional fishing and must request permission from the governor.

According to the lawsuit, the plaintiffs are members of an Ainu cultural preservation body based in the town of Urahoro. The group includes descendants of Ainu communities who had lived around the Tokachi River in Hokkaido since the Edo Period that began in the 17th century.
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2020/ ... us-rights/

If our Native Americans think they've got it bad, they should talk to the Ainu.

And, speaking of talking, here's a fun fact: There are tons of Ainu place names in Hokkaido. For example, "Urahoro" from that article and "Sapporo" are Ainu in origin.*

Now guess how many native Ainu speakers are still breathing.


If the "woke" mob ever come for me, I'm going to play the "public defender" card and tell them to fuck off. But, if that's not enough, I can point to a Legal History seminar I took in law school. It was a fluff class taught by a professor I worked for as a research assistant, but I wrote my seminar paper on the similarities in legal treatment between the Ainu and Native Americans.

The short version: The Ainu lost.


* I seem to recall "~horo", "~pporo", etc. means "river" in Ainu.
User avatar
Grammatron
Posts: 35248
Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2004 1:21 am
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: Japan

Post by Grammatron »

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Kamuy

Good Manga that goes over Ainu traditions, cultures, and history.

Caught between the empires of Russia and Japan the Ainu had no chance.
shuize
Posts: 3120
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:32 am

Re: Japan

Post by shuize »

Grammatron wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 2:23 am https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Kamuy

Good Manga that goes over Ainu traditions, cultures, and history.

Caught between the empires of Russia and Japan the Ainu had no chance.

I also seem to remember the Japanese didn't get serious about settling the interior of Hokkaido until the Russians started getting a bit too friendly with the Ainu. Most of Hokkaido was settled around the time we were pacifying the Native Americans. From what I've heard, it wasn't a picnic on the Japanese side either and a surprising number the early "soldier settlers" 「屯田兵」(tondenhei) died of exposure, disease, or even bear attack. My ex-wife's family in Hokkaido must have had some of their older relatives eaten by the "crescent moon bears" (ツキノワグマ)for as often as they talked about them. Although, as I made a point of telling them, for badass bears my money was still on grizzlies.
User avatar
Doctor X
Posts: 72897
Joined: Fri Jun 04, 2004 8:09 pm
Title: Collective Messiah
Location: Your Mom

Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

This may apply to the Ainu:



– J.D.
Mob of the Mean: Free beanie, cattle-prod and Charley Fan Club!
"Doctor X is just treating you the way he treats everyone--as subhuman crap too dumb to breathe in after you breathe out." – Don
DocX: FTW. – sparks
"Doctor X wins again." – Pyrrho
"Never sorry to make a racist Fucktard cry." – His Humble MagNIfIcence
"It was the criticisms of Doc X, actually, that let me see more clearly how far the hypocrisy had gone." – clarsct
"I'd leave it up to Doctor X who has been a benevolent tyrant so far." – Grammatron
"Indeed you are a river to your people.
Shit. That's going to end up in your sig." – Pyrrho
"Try a twelve step program and accept Doctor X as your High Power." – asthmatic camel
"just like Doc X said." – gnome

ImageWS CHAMPIONS X4!!!! ImageNBA CHAMPIONS!! Stanley Cup!Image SB CHAMPIONS X6!!!!!! Image
User avatar
Anaxagoras
Posts: 28059
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:45 am
Location: Yokohama/Tokyo, Japan

Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

FEATURE: Digital nomads riding out coronavirus pandemic in a van in Japan
A free-spirited American couple with the guts to pack up and go on a moment's notice is discovering how crucial skills like agility, flexibility and resilience are in extraordinary times like these.

Liezl Van Riper, 44, and her husband Viet Nguyen, 49, took their kids out of school last fall to let them learn some life lessons on the road, their motivating mantra that spontaneous travel is the most valuable type of travel.
"We saw what was happening with the borders closing in mid-March and I had a feeling that if we were going to Japan, this is it. So we dropped everything, bought the cheapest ticket from Thailand and made it into Osaka a week before the borders closed."
While much of the world sat at home feeling waves of fear and anxiety, the family found a bargain Airbnb listing in Kyoto and "did all the things you do in Kyoto but with no tourists," including cherry blossom viewing.
Must be pretty nice to go touristing without any other annoying tourists. :D

Lots of pictures if you follow the link.

BTW, I'm not a hater, but it occurred to me that some people who read this article are going to be jelly.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare
shuize
Posts: 3120
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:32 am

Re: Japan

Post by shuize »

Anaxagoras wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 8:12 am FEATURE: Digital nomads riding out coronavirus pandemic in a van in Japan
A free-spirited American couple with the guts to pack up and go on a moment's notice is discovering how crucial skills like agility, flexibility and resilience are in extraordinary times like these.

Liezl Van Riper, 44, and her husband Viet Nguyen, 49, took their kids out of school last fall to let them learn some life lessons on the road, their motivating mantra that spontaneous travel is the most valuable type of travel.
"We saw what was happening with the borders closing in mid-March and I had a feeling that if we were going to Japan, this is it. So we dropped everything, bought the cheapest ticket from Thailand and made it into Osaka a week before the borders closed."
While much of the world sat at home feeling waves of fear and anxiety, the family found a bargain Airbnb listing in Kyoto and "did all the things you do in Kyoto but with no tourists," including cherry blossom viewing.
Must be pretty nice to go touristing without any other annoying tourists. :D

Lots of pictures if you follow the link.

BTW, I'm not a hater, but it occurred to me that some people who read this article are going to be jelly.

If I'd known in mid-March we would be able to teach all our classes online, I might have tried to do the reverse and leave Japan for Thailand.

As a side note, I used to live about two blocks from where they were standing in that second picture at Dontonbori.
User avatar
Witness
Posts: 30260
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Japan

Post by Witness »

Bones of over 1,500 people found at Osaka Station area construction site

Image

The district around Osaka Station is called Umeda, and the sub-section where the redevelopment project is taking place is called Umekita (combining “Umeda” and kita/”north”). But once upon a time, it was known as Umeda Haka, or Umeda Grave, one of seven major cemeteries of Osaka. Because of that, survey teams for the Umekita redevelopment project have discovered the bones of more than 1,500 people at a project site, according to a recent announcement from the Osaka CIty Board of Education and Osaka City Cultural Properties Association.

Various burial styles were observed, ranging from enclosed wooden caskets to barrel-like open containers, as well as earthenware coffins called kameganbo (“turtle caskets”). While cremation is the norm in Japan now, surveyors found both cremated and non-cremated remains. Several of the bodies had also been interred with burial items such as juzudama (rosary-like prayer beads), rokusenmon (a set of six coins used to pay passage across the Sanzu River, said to separate the world of the living and the afterlife), pipes, and clay dolls.

In another section of the site, separated from the casket area by a stone wall, a mass grave with bodies of the deceased only covered by earth was found. Given the number of people who were apparently buried at the same time, researchers suspect the burial may have come following a plague that claimed the lives of many in a short period of time.
https://soranews24.com/2020/08/14/bones ... tion-site/
User avatar
Anaxagoras
Posts: 28059
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:45 am
Location: Yokohama/Tokyo, Japan

Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

Despite Japan govt's promise, not 'all citizens' can receive coronavirus cash handout

Even I received the handout (I'm a legal permanent resident and a taxpayer).

Who can't? The homeless.
Although Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced at an April press conference that "all citizens" would be eligible to receive the government's one-off 100,000-yen cash handout to soften the economic blow of the coronavirus pandemic, there is a portion of the population that has been unable to receive them: the homeless. This has those living on the streets asking whether they are "citizens," too.

"If I'd had 100,000 yen (approx. $947), I could've lived much differently," said a 68-year-old man who sleeps in front of a commercial building near Shinjuku Station's west exit in Tokyo.

Born in Akita Prefecture in northern Japan, the man arrived in Tokyo some 20 years ago looking for work. Unable to find stable employment, he began living on the streets about 10 years ago. As openings for day laborers decrease by the day, he visits soup kitchens run by support groups. He was unable to receive the government-issue "Abenomask" cloth face masks that all households were sent two of, and uses a mask that he bought himself. With libraries -- which are a comfortable place to pass the time -- limiting their accessibility to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, he escapes the summer heat by riding the loop JR Yamanote Line for hours a day. "Everyone's given up on getting the 100,000 yen," he said.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare
shuize
Posts: 3120
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:32 am

Re: Japan

Post by shuize »

Anaxagoras wrote: Thu Aug 20, 2020 12:04 am Despite Japan govt's promise, not 'all citizens' can receive coronavirus cash handout

Even I received the handout (I'm a legal permanent resident and a taxpayer).

Who can't? The homeless.
Although Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced at an April press conference that "all citizens" would be eligible to receive the government's one-off 100,000-yen cash handout to soften the economic blow of the coronavirus pandemic, there is a portion of the population that has been unable to receive them: the homeless. This has those living on the streets asking whether they are "citizens," too.

"If I'd had 100,000 yen (approx. $947), I could've lived much differently," said a 68-year-old man who sleeps in front of a commercial building near Shinjuku Station's west exit in Tokyo.

Born in Akita Prefecture in northern Japan, the man arrived in Tokyo some 20 years ago looking for work. Unable to find stable employment, he began living on the streets about 10 years ago. As openings for day laborers decrease by the day, he visits soup kitchens run by support groups. He was unable to receive the government-issue "Abenomask" cloth face masks that all households were sent two of, and uses a mask that he bought himself. With libraries -- which are a comfortable place to pass the time -- limiting their accessibility to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, he escapes the summer heat by riding the loop JR Yamanote Line for hours a day. "Everyone's given up on getting the 100,000 yen," he said.

Everyone in Japan is required to register their address.

Therefore, there are no homeless.
User avatar
Anaxagoras
Posts: 28059
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:45 am
Location: Yokohama/Tokyo, Japan

Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

Basically, yeah. As far as the government is concerned, they don't exist.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare
User avatar
Abdul Alhazred
Posts: 86044
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2004 1:33 pm
Title: Yes, that one.
Location: Not quite Chicago

Re: Japan

Post by Abdul Alhazred »

Best knockoff merch EVAR! :)

Image
Image "If I turn in a sicko, will I get a reward?"

"Yes! A BIG REWARD!" ====> Click here to turn in a sicko
The arc of the moral universe bends towards chaos.
People who believe God or History are on their side provide the chaos.
User avatar
Witness
Posts: 30260
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Japan

Post by Witness »

Image
1200 stone sculptures with different expressions on their faces at the nenbutsu-Ju Buddhist temple. Kyoto, Japan.