What's killing us this week?

Ever had it before? Well you got it again.
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Rob Lister
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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What happened to 2004?
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Witness
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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In Latin America, Dengue is deadlier than Coronavirus

In Latin America, not only is it more likely to get the dengue fever, but it is even more deadly than coronovirus, with a mortality rate as high as 20%, when left untreated.

The dengue fever outbreak in several Latin American countries is proving more dangerous and contagious than the coronavirus, a disease that is wreaking havoc worldwide.

More than 19 countries, including Bolivia, Panama, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay, are facing this disease that has taken thousands of human lives and continues to spread.

In Panama, two deaths and 1,012 confirmed cases have been reported so far in 2020. According to the Ministry of Health, 894 cases are not alarming, 112 are, and there are six serious cases.

The countries with the highest infection rates are in Central America. In Nicaragua there are approximately 2,271 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, in Belize 1,021, in Honduras 995 and in El Salvador 375, according to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

According to local media, there have been eight deaths from hemorrhagic dengue fever in Honduras in 2020, and at least 8,737 infections. Of these, 75% have been children.

In the case of Bolivia, the situation is also alarming since 7,790 cases have been confirmed in seven of the nine departments of the Andean country. In addition, the Ministry of Health reported 42,000 suspected cases, most of them in the city of Santa Cruz.
https://www.theyucatantimes.com/2020/03 ... ronavirus/
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Witness
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Nigeria Enduring Viral Outbreak 10 Times More Deadly Than Coronavirus

There have been four Lassa fever outbreaks in the past five years in Nigeria.

As countries around the world struggle to contain the coronavirus, scientists are warning of a more deadly viral outbreak in Africa. The people of Nigeria are dealing with what may be the world’s largest epidemic of Lassa fever, a viral disease killing more people than coronavirus.

Lassa fever is a severe viral hemorrhagic fever similar to the Ebola virus that affects areas of Nigeria throughout the year. It was declared an “active outbreak” by the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) in February. The epidemic usually occurs during the annual dry season, but this year, it has already spread across more than half the country.

The virus spreads through humans via contact with food or household items contaminated with rat urine and feces. It also can spread from person to person through contact with the body fluids and organs of infected people.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the illness was discovered in 1969 and is named after the town in Nigeria where the first cases occurred. "An estimated 100,000 to 300,000 infections of Lassa fever occur annually, with approximately 5,000 deaths," according to the CDC. This year, the outbreak experienced an escalation in Nigeria that started in the second week of the year. By the end of the ninth week, the country had seen 775 cases and 132 deaths spread across 75% of Nigerian states.
https://blavity.com/nigeria-enduring-vi ... World-News
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robinson
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Suddenly nobody cares
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Pyrrho
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Image
The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus.
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Witness
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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New, larger wave of locusts threatens millions in Africa

Image

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Weeks before the coronavirus spread through much of the world, parts of Africa were already threatened by another kind of plague, the biggest locust outbreak some countries had seen in 70 years.

Now the second wave of the voracious insects, some 20 times the size of the first, is arriving. Billions of the young desert locusts are winging in from breeding grounds in Somalia in search of fresh vegetation springing up with seasonal rains.

Millions of already vulnerable people are at risk. And as they gather to try to combat the locusts, often in vain, they risk spreading the virus — a topic that comes a distant second for many in rural areas.
https://apnews.com/517bb5588fc94403f797a2045095dcac
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Pyrrho
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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:Hungry2:

Only thing we need to complete the series is wars and rumors of wars.
The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus.
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Witness
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Dirt Poor: Have Fruits and Vegetables Become Less Nutritious?

Because of soil depletion, crops grown decades ago were much richer in vitamins and minerals than the varieties most of us get today

It would be overkill to say that the carrot you eat today has very little nutrition in it—especially compared to some of the other less healthy foods you likely also eat—but it is true that fruits and vegetables grown decades ago were much richer in vitamins and minerals than the varieties most of us get today. The main culprit in this disturbing nutritional trend is soil depletion: Modern intensive agricultural methods have stripped increasing amounts of nutrients from the soil in which the food we eat grows. Sadly, each successive generation of fast-growing, pest-resistant carrot is truly less good for you than the one before.

A landmark study on the topic by Donald Davis and his team of researchers from the University of Texas (UT) at Austin’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry was published in December 2004 in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. They studied U.S. Department of Agriculture nutritional data from both 1950 and 1999 for 43 different vegetables and fruits, finding “reliable declines” in the amount of protein, calcium, phosphorus, iron, riboflavin (vitamin B2) and vitamin C over the past half century. Davis and his colleagues chalk up this declining nutritional content to the preponderance of agricultural practices designed to improve traits (size, growth rate, pest resistance) other than nutrition.

“Efforts to breed new varieties of crops that provide greater yield, pest resistance and climate adaptability have allowed crops to grow bigger and more rapidly,” reported Davis, “but their ability to manufacture or uptake nutrients has not kept pace with their rapid growth.” There have likely been declines in other nutrients, too, he said, such as magnesium, zinc and vitamins B-6 and E, but they were not studied in 1950 and more research is needed to find out how much less we are getting of these key vitamins and minerals.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... tion-loss/ for the rest.
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robinson
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Rock dust
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Rob Lister
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Witness wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 2:38 am
...
There have likely been declines in other nutrients, too, he said, such as magnesium, zinc and vitamins B-6 and E, but they were not studied in 1950 and more research is needed to find out how much less we are getting of these key vitamins and minerals.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... tion-loss/ for the rest.
They need more data to support their foregone conclusion. :)

Perhaps they should partner with their economics department and find out if the greater* availability and lower* cost of said items makes it all a practical wash!



*See, I have my own foregone conclusions!
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Witness
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Rare, Nearly Extinct Parasite May Have Resurfaced in Vietnam, Doctors Say

Doctors in Vietnam this week say that they’ve made a mysterious and—if accurate—alarming discovery: A local resident who was infested with the nearly extinct Guinea worm. But Guinea worm experts are still trying to confirm whether this case is the genuine article, and if so, how the worm managed to reach a country thousands of miles away from its only known remaining refuge in parts of Africa.

The Guinea worm, formally known as Dracunculus medinensis, is an ancient parasite possibly referenced as far back as the Bible and named after the African region where European explorers in the 17th century first reported seeing it. It’s a nematode that explicitly relies on people as part of its cringe-inducing life cycle.

The worm usually infects people through drinking water contaminated with tiny freshwater crustaceans that have eaten worm larvae. When these first hosts die, the worms break free and penetrate into the abdomen from the intestinal wall, where they grow up into full-fledged adults and get to mating.

When the mama worm (which are much longer than male worms and can extend up to 2.5 feet or 80 centimeters in length) is ready to deliver her progeny, she migrates to just below the surface of the skin, usually along our legs and feet. Then she very painfully breaks through the skin, causing a tremendous burning sensation that makes its hosts desperate to cool off at the nearest water source. As soon that happens, the mother squirts out her clutch of larvae into the water, where the very disturbing cycle starts again. From infestation to being a worm baby surrogate, the process can take a year’s time. But it can still take several painful weeks after for the original worm—or worms—to be removed, which can leave people at risk for other infections and disabled for months.

As recently as the 1980s, the Guinea worm was commonly found in tropical and subtropical areas of Africa and Asia, and infected millions of people in Africa alone annually. But a decades-long eradication program has steadily beat back the worm to only a handful of countries and cases in Africa every year. Though these eradication efforts have taken a stumble as of late, with the discovery that the worm can also routinely infect dogs as well as humans, the worm is still expected to be wiped off the face of the Earth by 2030. That makes the potential case in Vietnam all the more baffling and concerning.
https://gizmodo.com/rare-nearly-extinct ... 1844015183
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shemp
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Hard to believe there's a parasite worse than Trump.
"It is not I who is mad! It is I who is crazy!" -- Ren Hoek

"what dicking deep shit i produce" -- pillory

Freedom of choice
Is what you got
Freedom from choice
Is what you want

People are shitting themselves to death
Crap so much they fail to take a breath
But even when their kids are starvin'
They thought Trump would throw them Charmin.
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robinson
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Witness
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Longitudinal study links energy drink consumption to depression, anxiety and stress

Energy drinks are potent mixtures of ingredients like caffeine, guarana, sugar, ginseng, and aspartame. They are intended (and marketed) to improve mood, alertness and productivity—but may have long-term secondary effects that are decidedly less beneficial.

A variety of cross-sectional studies has already examined the relationship between energy drink consumption and mental health problems like anxiety, depression, and increased feelings of stress. Few to date, however, have done so longitudinally, meaning that causal relationships have been difficult to determine or demonstrate.

To remedy this, the present study looked at data from 897 individuals who have been followed from birth in the context of the previously published Raine study. Questionnaires were given at age 20 and again at age 22 regarding, among others, energy drink consumption and mood.

After controlling for parental mental health, illicit drug use, dietary patterns, family income, parental alcohol consumption and cigarette use, BMI, physical activity and other factors, the researchers found that changes in energy drink consumption were positively associated with increased stress scores and, in young adult males, depression and anxiety.

The authors have made valiant efforts to control for confounding variables, and propose several ways by which energy drink consumption may affect mod, including altering sleep behavior. The possibility of some upstream behavior or other element acting on energy drink consumption and depression and anxiety separately, however, is left largely unexplored.
https://www.psypost.org/2021/02/longitu ... ress-59626 for the rest.
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Witness
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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Ketogenic diets inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis and induce cardiac fibrosis

Abstract

In addition to their use in relieving the symptoms of various diseases, ketogenic diets (KDs) have also been adopted by healthy individuals to prevent being overweight. Herein, we reported that prolonged KD exposure induced cardiac fibrosis. In rats, KD or frequent deep fasting decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, reduced cell respiration, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac fibrosis. Mechanistically, increased levels of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), an HDAC2 inhibitor, promoted histone acetylation of the Sirt7 promoter and activated Sirt7 transcription. This in turn inhibited the transcription of mitochondrial ribosome-encoding genes and mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac fibrosis. Exogenous β-OHB administration mimicked the effects of a KD in rats. Notably, increased β-OHB levels and SIRT7 expression, decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased cardiac fibrosis were detected in human atrial fibrillation heart tissues. Our results highlighted the unknown detrimental effects of KDs and provided insights into strategies for preventing cardiac fibrosis in patients for whom KDs are medically necessary.

Introduction

The low-carbohydrate, high-fat ketogenic diet (KD) is a remarkably effective treatment for medically intractable epilepsy and has been applied in the clinical setting for over 70 years. In addition, KDs have been widely applied in the clinical treatment of various diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. KDs are also used by healthy individuals, predominantly to promote weight loss.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41392-020-00411-4
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Pyrrho
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7901106/
We admitted a 58-year-old white male patient, with no relevant medical history, to our department with a brain stem infarct. During his stay at our stroke unit, the patient performed a self-neck massage with consecutive bradycardia and asystole, resulting in left-side hemiparesis. The underlying cause of the hemodynamic stroke is believed to be secondary to this intensive neck massage performed by the patient. The patient also suffered from unknown right internal carotid artery stenosis.
The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus.
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Witness
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Re: What's killing us this week?

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