London Mud

What's your artifact doing in Boss Kean's ditch?
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Witness
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London Mud

Post by Witness » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:24 am

[youtube][/youtube]

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ed
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Re: London Mud

Post by ed » Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:04 pm

That is very cool, thanks.

I recall reading about the discovery of a sword from the Thames in the vicinity of where a ferry used to dock in the middle ages. I'd love to drag an electromagnet along the bottom.
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Grammatron
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Re: London Mud

Post by Grammatron » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:13 pm

ed wrote:That is very cool, thanks.

I recall reading about the discovery of a sword from the Thames in the vicinity of where a ferry used to dock in the middle ages. I'd love to drag an electromagnet along the bottom.
I wonder if there's any unexploded ordinance.

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ed
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Re: London Mud

Post by ed » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:46 pm

Grammatron wrote:
ed wrote:That is very cool, thanks.

I recall reading about the discovery of a sword from the Thames in the vicinity of where a ferry used to dock in the middle ages. I'd love to drag an electromagnet along the bottom.
I wonder if there's any unexploded ordinance.
Fuck yeah. You know, I seem to recall that the Mary Rose had some incendiaries.
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Grammatron
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Re: London Mud

Post by Grammatron » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:50 pm

ed wrote:
Grammatron wrote:
ed wrote:That is very cool, thanks.

I recall reading about the discovery of a sword from the Thames in the vicinity of where a ferry used to dock in the middle ages. I'd love to drag an electromagnet along the bottom.
I wonder if there's any unexploded ordinance.
Fuck yeah. You know, I seem to recall that the Mary Rose had some incendiaries.
Then dragging an electromagnet would be quite a show!

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sparks
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Re: London Mud

Post by sparks » Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:04 pm

ed will wisely hire that job out and observe from a distance.
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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: London Mud

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:43 pm

Finally got around to watching the video.

Interesting that they call themselves "mudlarks".

In Dickens' day, mudlarks were beggars who would dive into the Thames mud after thrown coins. Watching them dive into the mud was considered great sport among the less refined wealthy.

Of course a gentleman would have no truck with such a thing.
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Re: London Mud

Post by Witness » Wed Mar 15, 2017 3:09 am

ed wrote:I recall reading about the discovery of a sword from the Thames in the vicinity of where a ferry used to dock in the middle ages. I'd love to drag an electromagnet along the bottom.
Goes even back to Antiquity, then the Vikings, &c.

Image
British Museum wrote:Curator's comments

Manning 1985
Both plates may have been standard products, mass-produced for such sheaths. An even finer example of this kind of scabbard is the 'Sword of Tiberius' from Mainz in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities (registration no. GR 1866,0806.1).

It is an example, apparently unique in Britain, of the type of gladius which was current in the first part of the first century AD, a type which, as its design makes clear, was intended primarily as a stabbing weapon. Günter Ulbert has called it the Mainz type (Ulbert 1969a), for the largest group, including the Sword of Tiberius, comes from the River Rhine at that city. Sometime before or around the middle of the first century this design was replaced by a new type with a blade of similar length (c. 50 cm), but with parallel edges which begin to converge about 5 cm to 10 cm from the tip to give a relatively short point. With a width of c. 5 cm they are slightly narrower than the blades of the Mainz type. This new form Ulbert called the Pompeii type, after examples found there (Ulbert 1969a, 97ff.).
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/c ... 9&partId=1

And also nice trinkets:

Image
The Guardian wrote:Tiny Tudor treasure hoard found in Thames mud

A very small treasure hoard – a handful of tiny fragments of beautifully worked Tudor gold – has been harvested from a muddy stretch of the Thames foreshore over a period of years by eight different metal detectorists.

The pieces all date from the early 16th century, and the style of the tiny pieces of gold is so similar that Kate Sumnall, an archaeologist, believes they all came from the disastrous loss of one fabulous garment, possibly a hat snatched off a passenger’s head by a gust of wind at a time when the main river crossings were the myriad ferry boats.

Such metal objects, including aglets – metal tips for laces – beads and studs, originally had a practical purpose as garment fasteners but by the early 16th century were being worn in gold as high-status ornaments, making costly fabrics such as velvet and furs even more ostentatious. Contemporary portraits, including one in the National Portrait Gallery of the Dacres, Mary Neville and Gregory Fiennes, show their sleeves festooned with pairs of such ornaments.
https://www.theguardian.com/culture/201 ... -mud#img-1

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Witness
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Re: London Mud

Post by Witness » Mon Sep 02, 2019 1:33 am

Mudlarking, by Lara Maiklem

Lara Maiklem shares the delights of mudlarking on the foreshore of the River Thames.

Lara has scoured the banks of the Thames for over fifteen years, in pursuit of the objects that the river offers up from its muddy depths - from Neolithic flints to Roman hair pins, medieval buckles to a Tudor shoe, along with Georgian clay pipes, Victorian toys and semi-precious stones. These objects tell her about the people who lived in or visited London and how they ate, drank, dressed, worked and loved.

Moving from the river's tidal origins in the west of the city to the point where it meets the sea in the east, Mudlarking is a search for urban solitude and history on the River Thames, a place Lara describes as the longest archaeological landscape in England. And, as she has discovered, it is often the tiniest objects that tell the most surprising and enthralling stories.

Those inspired by the book to have a go themselves should be aware that anyone wishing to search the tidal Thames foreshore must hold a current foreshore permit from the Port of London Authority.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0007k5k

Five sound episodes at the link.