Perpetual dinosaur thread

What's your artifact doing in Boss Kean's ditch?
User avatar
Witness
Posts: 33096
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Not a dinosaur, but hey!

Image

Quetzalcoutlus northropi.
User avatar
Rob Lister
Posts: 23331
Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2004 7:15 pm
Title: Incipient toppler
Location: Swimming in Lake Ed

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Rob Lister »

Good eats.
User avatar
ed
Posts: 40113
Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2004 11:52 pm
Title: G_D

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by ed »

Abdul Alhazred wrote: Mon Aug 05, 2019 11:41 am Dinosaur sighting not far from where I live. 8)

Image

Damn dinosaurs shit all over everything. :evil:
Ha! Recognize it!!!

I can hunt you down now.

Except i won't leave fla. And i am too lazy to actually hunt you down. You'd have to come here and self immolate in some horrid way or the other.

I think you are probably safe
This space for let
User avatar
robinson
Posts: 12259
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2006 2:01 am
Title: Pretty much dead already
Location: USA

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

Witness wrote: Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:28 pm
Skull of Smallest Dinosaur Discovered in Amber

Researchers say it is tinier than the smallest living bird, the bee hummingbird, and raises questions about bird evolution.

Image
A 99-million-year old piece of amber containing the skull of a bird that measures a little more than half an inch long.
The piece of amber — about 99 million years old — is smaller than a fingertip, Dr. O’Connor and a team of researchers report on Wednesday in the journal Nature, and suspended inside of it is the skull of the smallest known bird, and, therefore, dinosaur, ever discovered. They called the bird Oculudentavis khaungraae — a name that comes from the Latin words for eye, teeth and bird. The dinosaur’s skull is only 14.25 millimeters, or a little more than half an inch, from its beak to the end of its skull. The animal had bulbous eyes that looked out from the sides of its head, rather than straight ahead like the eyes of an owl or a human.

“We were able to show that this skull is even smaller than that of a bee hummingbird, which is the smallest dinosaur of all time — also the smallest bird,” Dr. O’Connor said. “This is a tiny skull, and it’s just preserved absolutely pristinely.”

Bee hummingbirds, which are still alive today and found in Cuba, have braincases — for birds, that means the skull minus the length of the beak — that measure about 8.8 millimeters long, while the braincase of Oculudentavis is about 7.1 millimeters, or just over a quarter of an inch long. Oculudentavis also has more teeth in its mouth than any other known fossil bird, suggesting the bird was a predator that hunted other creatures.

That it sported so many teeth, though, creates confusion about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs and birds.

Most scientists now believe that birds are theropods, dinosaurs of a group that included tyrannosaurus and spinosaurus, but that birds were on their own evolutionary branch from a common ancestor. Paleontologists have long assumed that as birds evolved away from other dinosaurs, having teeth was a trait that was in the process of disappearing altogether. “But this specimen strongly shows that evolution’s really going in all different directions,” Dr. O’Connor said.

Image
A CT scan of the skull of Oculudentavis, which means eye tooth bird.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/11/scie ... amber.html
Could it just be a baby bird?
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
User avatar
robinson
Posts: 12259
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2006 2:01 am
Title: Pretty much dead already
Location: USA

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

I mean dinosaur?
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
User avatar
robinson
Posts: 12259
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2006 2:01 am
Title: Pretty much dead already
Location: USA

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

Abdul Alhazred wrote: Tue Jul 21, 2020 12:39 pm Dr Matt figured out who I was and called me on the phone.

Not implying anything, just sayin' :)
I would talk to you on the phone
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
User avatar
robinson
Posts: 12259
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2006 2:01 am
Title: Pretty much dead already
Location: USA

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

Wow that is so off topic
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
User avatar
Witness
Posts: 33096
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Witness wrote: Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:28 pm
Skull of Smallest Dinosaur Discovered in Amber
Retracted:
Retraction Note: Hummingbird-sized dinosaur from the Cretaceous period of Myanmar

We, the authors, are retracting this Article to prevent inaccurate information from remaining in the literature. Although the description of Oculudentavis khaungraae remains accurate, a new unpublished specimen casts doubts upon our hypothesis regarding the phylogenetic position of HPG-15-3.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2553-9

Perhaps not so much because of an erroneous phylogeny as the dubious origin of the "Burmese" amber.
User avatar
Witness
Posts: 33096
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

This fossil reveals how dinosaurs peed, pooped and had sex

Image

We know a lot about dinosaurs -- what they looked like, what they ate and what killed them off -- but no fossils have definitively preserved two dinosaurs in the act of mating.
However, a fossil from China of a Psittacosaurus is so well preserved that the opening the Labrador-size dinosaur used to pee, poop and reproduce is visible, allowing paleontologists to study it for the first time.
While it doesn't offer any concrete answers on how dinosaurs may have procreated, it does give some hints.
"We don't have any dinosaur fossils where you can be confident they've been caught in the act," said Jakob Vinther, a paleontologist and senior lecturer at the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences.
What we know is "based on natural history where we compare it to living groups of animals."
While most mammals have separate holes for bodily functions, many other animals -- including birds and reptiles -- have just one and it's known as the cloaca.
The fossilized cloaca confirms that dinosaurs had one but it doesn't look like that of any other living animals.

Image

"It is very unique. Most cloacas form a kind of slit. Sometimes it's a vertical split, sometimes it's a smiley face, sometimes it's a sour face. This thing has a V-shaped structure with a pair of nice flaring lips and there's not a living groups of animals that have morphology like that," Vinther said. "It is somewhat similar to crocodiles but still unique."
The study, which published in the journal Current Biology on Tuesday, said that large, pigmented lobes on either side of the opening could have harbored musky scent glands, as seen in living crocodiles and alligators.
What's more, the outer margins of the cloaca are highly pigmented with melanin. While they don't know for sure what color it was, it likely would have contrasted with the dinosaur's pale underbelly, Vinther said.
This distinctive pigmentation could mean the vent was used to display and signal, similar to living baboons and some breeding salamanders.
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/01/19/worl ... index.html