Why is the Pope in such bad shape?

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millionframe
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Why is the Pope in such bad shape?

Post by millionframe »

"He (the current Pope) was hit once by a streetcar and again by a truck in 1944 while a college student. The injuries left the otherwise robust pope -- 5-foot-10 1/2 inches, 175 pounds in his prime -- with a slight stoop to his shoulders that is particularly noticeable when he is tired."

"Even as an adult he has been beset by physical difficulties, including a dislocated shoulder, a broken thigh that led to femur-replacement surgery, the removal of a precancerous tumor from his colon and an attempt on his life by a gunman whose two bullets wounded the pope in the abdomen, right arm and left hand."

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/1999/pope/bio/early/

If I didn't know better, I'd think God was trying to knock him off.
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thaiboxerken
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Post by thaiboxerken »

Yea, I would think god's "main man" would be somewhat impervious to harm. Oh well.
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LostAngeles
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Post by LostAngeles »

No, no.

God was <b>TESTING</b> him.
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MRC_Hans
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Post by MRC_Hans »

Mmm, one might say that God's PR dept. is not working as well as at the time of Jesus. Perhaps they have been resting on their laurels since then?

The pope is certainly not a very inspiring representative, especially not if you wanna capture the youth.

Perhaps God is just thinking: "Nevermind. I'm gonna get them all in the end."

Hans
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ceo_esq
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Post by ceo_esq »

MRC_Hans wrote:The pope is certainly not a very inspiring representative, especially not if you wanna capture the youth.
This view doesn't seem to be generally shared, however. The current pope's popularity throughout the world is pretty phenomenal, and by all indications his popularity among young Catholics in particular outstrips that of his predecessors.
Last edited by ceo_esq on Tue Jun 22, 2004 3:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
ceo_esq
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Post by ceo_esq »

[delete - double post]
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hgc
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Post by hgc »

ceo_esq wrote:
MRC_Hans wrote:The pope is certainly not a very inspiring representative, especially not if you wanna capture the youth.
This view doesn't seem to be generally shared, however. The current pope's popularity throughout the world is pretty phenomenal, and by all indications his popularity among young Catholics in particular outstrips that of his predecessors.
Evidence of the power of style over substance. Do young Catholics all over the world really embrace the retro-conservative policies of this pope? I think he's a PR master; constantly travelling, and making himself accessible; focusing on youth in his public outreach.
ceo_esq
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Post by ceo_esq »

hgc wrote:
ceo_esq wrote:
MRC_Hans wrote:The pope is certainly not a very inspiring representative, especially not if you wanna capture the youth.
This view doesn't seem to be generally shared, however. The current pope's popularity throughout the world is pretty phenomenal, and by all indications his popularity among young Catholics in particular outstrips that of his predecessors.
Evidence of the power of style over substance. Do young Catholics all over the world really embrace the retro-conservative policies of this pope? I think he's a PR master; constantly travelling, and making himself accessible; focusing on youth in his public outreach.
I daresay some young Catholics share most of the pope's opinions, while others embrace only some of them (it seems unlikely that a young person could reject a majority of the pope's opinions, of course, and still fairly be described as Catholic). The point is, this pope seems to be an unusually popular figure with Catholic youth, contrary to MRC_Hans' suggestion.


It's a little problematic to characterize the pope as a conservative (or "retro-conservative", as you put it), except in a doctrinal sense (and of course, the Church's doctrines are not really "policies" of the pope). For example, the professionals over at PoliticalCompass.org rate the pope as a leftist, and on the authoritarian/libertarian spectrum they identify him as moderately authoritarian, but no more so than (for example) Tony Blair of Great Britain. It seems plausible that a number of the pope's important priorities would be quite palatable to young Catholics (e.g. support of the rights of workers, immigrants and the poor; opposition to the death penalty; ecumenism; and many others). Accordingly, I query whether his popularity with them is entirely a matter of the triumph style over substance.
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Skeeve
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Post by Skeeve »

Perhaps the Pope has been jobbed? :twisted:
Then Skank Of America could start in...
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Nigel
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Post by Nigel »

This reminds me of one of the greatest lines I ever heard. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall was retiring, and a reporter asked why.

"'Cuz I'm old," was the reply.

The Pope, on the other hand, can't retire voluntarily.
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ceo_esq
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Post by ceo_esq »

Nigel wrote:The Pope, on the other hand, can't retire voluntarily.
Untrue. Popes can resign, and some of them have resigned. No procedure exists for a pope to be definitively removed from office involuntarily, however.

According to the author of Inside the Vatican: The Politics and Organization of the Catholic Church (Harvard University Press, 1996):
Yes, a pope can resign. The number of popes who may have resigned has been estimated as high as 10, but the historical evidence is not clear. Most recently, during the Council of Constance in the 15th century, the pope resigned to bring about the end of the Western Schism and a new pope was elected in 1417. Pope Celestine V’s resignation in 1294 is the most famous because Dante placed him in hell for it. Most modern popes have felt that resignation is unacceptable. As Paul VI said, paternity cannot be resigned. In addition, Paul feared setting a precedent that would encourage factions in the church to pressure future popes to resign for reasons other than health. Nevertheless, the code of canon law in 1917 provided for the resignation of a pope as do the regulations established by Paul VI in 1975 and John Paul II in 1996. However, a resignation induced through fear or fraud would be invalid. In addition, canonists argue that a person resigning from an office must be of sound mind (canon 187).
(source)
CHARLEY_BIGTIME

Post by CHARLEY_BIGTIME »

ceo_esq wrote:
Nigel wrote:The Pope, on the other hand, can't retire voluntarily.
Untrue. Popes can resign, and some of them have resigned. No procedure exists for a pope to be definitively removed from office involuntarily, however.

According to the author of Inside the Vatican: The Politics and Organization of the Catholic Church (Harvard University Press, 1996):
Yes, a pope can resign. The number of popes who may have resigned has been estimated as high as 10, but the historical evidence is not clear. Most recently, during the Council of Constance in the 15th century, the pope resigned to bring about the end of the Western Schism and a new pope was elected in 1417. Pope Celestine V’s resignation in 1294 is the most famous because Dante placed him in hell for it. Most modern popes have felt that resignation is unacceptable. As Paul VI said, paternity cannot be resigned. In addition, Paul feared setting a precedent that would encourage factions in the church to pressure future popes to resign for reasons other than health. Nevertheless, the code of canon law in 1917 provided for the resignation of a pope as do the regulations established by Paul VI in 1975 and John Paul II in 1996. However, a resignation induced through fear or fraud would be invalid. In addition, canonists argue that a person resigning from an office must be of sound mind (canon 187).
(source)
According to some sources:

Clement I

St. Pontain

Benedict IX

Celestine II

Celestine V

Greg VI

Greg XII


There's probably more, but I can't be arsed.
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Vic Daring
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Post by Vic Daring »

Why is the Pope in such bad shape?
Because he doesn't work out?
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