Taking notes? A Presentation? Verbal debate help required.

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CHARLEY_BIGTIME

Post by CHARLEY_BIGTIME »

Fluffy wrote:I seem to be forever asking for help. Sorry. :(

I am to do next week from Act 1 of Romeo and Juliet. Two parts of my choice and of characters.

I am to read them aloud and if I feel so brave, wave my arms and add the emotional elements to them. I am also to explain what is going on in those parts.

HELP and advice needed!

I am struggling badly with the language and comprehension on this. :oops: :(


I was thinking on doing Mercutio as one, the end scene where Tybalt kills him. I enjoyed that in the Leonardo De Caprio film I watched. Perhaps Father Lawrence's part???


Shall I write what I think and somebody might like to correct me or what do you think is best?
I've answered that one somewhere else. :wink:

Guest

Post by Guest »

CHARLEY_BIGTIME wrote:
I've answered that one somewhere else. :wink:
Yes thank you you did and so did I :D

CHARLEY_BIGTIME

Post by CHARLEY_BIGTIME »

Fluffy wrote:
CHARLEY_BIGTIME wrote:
I've answered that one somewhere else. :wink:
Yes thank you you did and so did I :D
So you *are* following me around?

Guest

Post by Guest »

CHARLEY_BIGTIME wrote:
So you *are* following me around?
No just being polite Charley :P :D

CHARLEY_BIGTIME

Post by CHARLEY_BIGTIME »

Fluffy wrote:
CHARLEY_BIGTIME wrote:
So you *are* following me around?
No just being polite Charley :P :D
So that's what it's called these days...

Guest

Post by Guest »

SCENE IV. A Street.

MERCUTIO PARTS. I am interpreting that I must read all the parts, which were unclear in the instructions given. If not I will read Mercutio’s Queen Mab. Speech. In the brackets I added what I thought was the emotional element.
MERCUTIO
‘Nay, gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.’
Mercutio, tells Romeo to enjoy himself at the party, they insist. (Jovial)
MERCUTIO
‘You are a lover; borrow Cupid's wings,
and soar with them above a common bound.’
Mercutio is just taking the piss as ever, He is saying that Romeo falls in love to many times. At the party they expect Romeo to do so again and again. He is also trying to lift Romeo’s mood by jesting. (In jest with light humour)
MERCUTIO
‘And, to sink in it, should you burden love;
Too great oppression for a tender thing.’
Mercutio is saying that Romeo that loves is not melancholy but is gentle warmth. (Sarcasm/humour)
MERCUTIO
‘If love be rough with you, be rough with love;
Prick love for pricking, and you beat love down.
Give me a case to put my visage in:
A visor for a visor! What care I
what curious eye doth quote deformities?
Here are the beetle brows shall blush for me.’
Mercutio means treat like with like. He then ask for his mask but adds that a mask hides all manners of things.( matter of fact but added jest in a sarcastic form)
MERCUTIO
‘Tut, dun's the mouse, the constable's own word:
If thou art dun, we'll draw thee from the mire
Of this sir-reverence love, wherein thou stick'st
Up to the ears. Come, we burn daylight, ho!’
Mercutio is saying if Romeo wants to act like a wallflower then thinks again. He will change his mind at seeing Verona’s other gems that night. (Patience wearing thin)
MERCUTIO
‘I mean, sir, in delay
We waste our lights in vain, like lamps by day.
Take our good meaning, for our judgment sits
Five times in that ere once in our five wits.’
Mercutio, tells him to hurry up and actually listen to what they are saying. (Abrupt like an order)
MERCUTIO
Why, may one ask?
Mercutio asks about Romeo’s reluctance to go to the ball. (Puzzled)
MERCUTIO
‘And so did I.’
After Romeo says he had a dream, Mercutio replies likewise he dreams too. (Roll eyes emotion, again a matter of fact)
MERCUTIO
‘That dreamers often lie’
Adding that dreams are not the truth, they are just that dreams. (Blunt to the point)
MERCUTIO
O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you.
She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes
In shape no bigger than an agate-stone
On the fore-finger of an alderman,
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep;
Her wagon-spokes made of long spiders' legs,
The cover of the wings of grasshoppers,
The traces of the smallest spider's web,
The collars of the moonshine's watery beams,
Her whip of cricket's bone, the lash of film,
Her wagoner a small grey-coated gnat,
Not so big as a round little worm
Prick'd from the lazy finger of a maid;
Her chariot is an empty hazel-nut
Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub,
Time out o' mind the fairies' coachmakers.
And in this state she gallops night by night
Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love;
O'er courtiers' knees, that dream on court'sies straight,
O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees,
O'er ladies ' lips, who straight on kisses dream,
Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues,
Because their breaths with sweetmeats tainted are:
Sometime she gallops o'er a courtier's nose,
And then dreams he of smelling out a suit;
And sometime comes she with a tithe-pig's tail
Tickling a parson's nose as a' lies asleep,
Then dreams, he of another benefice:
Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck,
And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades,
Of healths five-fathom deep; and then anon
Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes,
And being thus frighted swears a prayer or two
And sleeps again. This is that very Mab
That plats the manes of horses in the night,
And bakes the elflocks in foul sluttish hairs,
Which once untangled, much misfortune bodes:
This is the hag, when maids lie on their backs,
That presses them and learns them first to bear,
Making them women of good carriage:
This is she—
Mercutio says the Queen Mab is kinder to women than men. Mab is so small that she goes unnoticed in her carriage drawn by a gnat during the night. When Mab calls on the females she adds seduction, femininity and gentleness to their personality by giving them dreams of love. Again at childbirth she is there to bring the fruit of her dream instructions into the world. For men Mab is not so kind, she brings the nightmares of death, brutishness and violence. She shapes men so. Mab can bring together lovers or she can destroy them, such is her power. (Getting angrier, angry at he end also most venomous)
MERCUTIO
‘True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy,
Which is as thin of substance as the air
And more inconstant than the wind, who wooes
Even now the frozen bosom of the north,
And, being anger'd, puffs away from thence,
Turning his face to the dew-dropping south’
He is saying that dreams are nothing. They are random from being those of nightmares to soothing dreams. There is no pattern or meaning to them. (Matter of fact with a twist of wicked humour, having seen it has registered into Romeo's thick skull what he has said)

Guest

Post by Guest »

SCENE IV. A Street.

MERCUTIO PARTS. I am interpreting that I must read all the parts, which were unclear in the instructions given. If not I will read Mercutio’s Queen Mab. Speech. In the brackets I added what I thought was the emotional element.
MERCUTIO
‘Nay, gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.’
Mercutio, tells Romeo to enjoy himself at the party, they insist. (Jovial)
MERCUTIO
‘You are a lover; borrow Cupid's wings,
and soar with them above a common bound.’
Mercutio is just taking the piss as ever, He is saying that Romeo falls in love to many times. At the party they expect Romeo to do so again and again. He is also trying to lift Romeo’s mood by jesting. (In jest with light humour)
MERCUTIO
‘And, to sink in it, should you burden love;
Too great oppression for a tender thing.’
Mercutio is saying that Romeo that loves is not melancholy but is gentle warmth. (Sarcasm/humour)
MERCUTIO
‘If love be rough with you, be rough with love;
Prick love for pricking, and you beat love down.
Give me a case to put my visage in:
A visor for a visor! What care I
what curious eye doth quote deformities?
Here are the beetle brows shall blush for me.’
Mercutio means treat like with like. He then ask for his mask but adds that a mask hides all manners of things.( matter of fact but added jest in a sarcastic form)
MERCUTIO
‘Tut, dun's the mouse, the constable's own word:
If thou art dun, we'll draw thee from the mire
Of this sir-reverence love, wherein thou stick'st
Up to the ears. Come, we burn daylight, ho!’
Mercutio is saying if Romeo wants to act like a wallflower then thinks again. He will change his mind at seeing Verona’s other gems that night. (Patience wearing thin)
MERCUTIO
‘I mean, sir, in delay
We waste our lights in vain, like lamps by day.
Take our good meaning, for our judgment sits
Five times in that ere once in our five wits.’
Mercutio, tells him to hurry up and actually listen to what they are saying. (Abrupt like an order)
MERCUTIO
Why, may one ask?
Mercutio asks about Romeo’s reluctance to go to the ball. (Puzzled)
MERCUTIO
‘And so did I.’
After Romeo says he had a dream, Mercutio replies likewise he dreams too. (Roll eyes emotion, again a matter of fact)
MERCUTIO
‘That dreamers often lie’
Adding that dreams are not the truth, they are just that dreams. (Blunt to the point)
MERCUTIO
O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you.
She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes
In shape no bigger than an agate-stone
On the fore-finger of an alderman,
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep;
Her wagon-spokes made of long spiders' legs,
The cover of the wings of grasshoppers,
The traces of the smallest spider's web,
The collars of the moonshine's watery beams,
Her whip of cricket's bone, the lash of film,
Her wagoner a small grey-coated gnat,
Not so big as a round little worm
Prick'd from the lazy finger of a maid;
Her chariot is an empty hazel-nut
Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub,
Time out o' mind the fairies' coachmakers.
And in this state she gallops night by night
Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love;
O'er courtiers' knees, that dream on court'sies straight,
O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees,
O'er ladies ' lips, who straight on kisses dream,
Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues,
Because their breaths with sweetmeats tainted are:
Sometime she gallops o'er a courtier's nose,
And then dreams he of smelling out a suit;
And sometime comes she with a tithe-pig's tail
Tickling a parson's nose as a' lies asleep,
Then dreams, he of another benefice:
Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck,
And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades,
Of healths five-fathom deep; and then anon
Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes,
And being thus frighted swears a prayer or two
And sleeps again. This is that very Mab
That plats the manes of horses in the night,
And bakes the elflocks in foul sluttish hairs,
Which once untangled, much misfortune bodes:
This is the hag, when maids lie on their backs,
That presses them and learns them first to bear,
Making them women of good carriage:
This is she—
Mercutio says the Queen Mab is kinder to women than men. Mab is so small that she goes unnoticed in her carriage drawn by a gnat during the night. When Mab calls on the females she adds seduction, femininity and gentleness to their personality by giving them dreams of love. Again at childbirth she is there to bring the fruit of her dream instructions into the world. For men Mab is not so kind, she brings the nightmares of death, brutishness and violence. She shapes men so. Mab can bring together lovers or she can destroy them, such is her power. (Getting angrier, angry at he end also most venomous)
MERCUTIO
‘True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy,
Which is as thin of substance as the air
And more inconstant than the wind, who wooes
Even now the frozen bosom of the north,
And, being anger'd, puffs away from thence,
Turning his face to the dew-dropping south’
He is saying that dreams are nothing. They are random from being those of nightmares to soothing dreams. There is no pattern or meaning to them. (Matter of fact with a twist of wicked humour, having seen it has registered into Romeo's thick skull what he has said)

Guest

Post by Guest »

Benvolio. Act 1 scene 2
BENVOLIO ‘Part, fools!
Put up your swords; you know not what you do.’
Benvolio wants them to stop before another brawl happens.( orderly and calm)
BENVOLIO ‘I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me.’
Tells Tybalt that he is here only as acting as a peace maker between their servants. He then asks him to help him stop the fight escalating and take control of his servants.(Demanding but honest)
BENVOLIO ‘Here were the servants of your adversary,
And yours, close fighting ere I did approach:
I drew to part them: in the instant came
The fiery Tybalt, with his sword prepared,
Which, as he breathed defiance to my ears,
He swung about his head and cut the winds,
Who nothing hurt withal hiss'd him in scorn:
While we were interchanging thrusts and blows,
Came more and more and fought on part and part,
Till the prince came, who parted either part.’
Tells Lord Monague that the servants started the lastest bout of fighting, he interevened and was managing to stop the fight from kicking off but Tybalt wanted to fight and so the fighting began up again between them all. (explains calmly)
BENVOLIO ‘Madam, an hour before the worshipp'd sun
Peer'd forth the golden window of the east,
A troubled mind drave me to walk abroad;
Where, underneath the grove of sycamore
That westward rooteth from the city's side,
So early walking did I see your son:
Towards him I made, but he was ware of me
And stole into the covert of the wood:
I, measuring his affections by my own,
That most are busied when they're most alone,
Pursued my humour not pursuing his,
And gladly shunn'd who gladly fled from me.’[/quote[
Tells Lady Monague that her son keeps to himself and at odd times he is seen walking forlornly along. Romeo shuns company of others and prefers his own when approached he runs off and hides. ( caringly and perplexed by Romeos actions)
BENVOLIO ‘My noble uncle, do you know the cause?’
Asking his uncle of he knows what is up with Romeo(Questioning)
BENVOLIO ‘Have you importuned him by any means?’
Asks if he has asked Romeo what the problem is(Questioning)

BENVOLIO ‘See, where he comes: so please you, step aside;
I'll know his grievance, or be much denied.’
Sees Romeo and tells his parents to observe how he is and tells them he will go and find out what troubles Romeo so.( Sympathetic and caring)
BENVOLIO ‘Good-morrow, cousin.’
Greets Romeo, (Cheerfully)
BENVOLIO ‘But new struck nine’
Tells Romeo the time (concerned).
BENVOLIO ‘It was. What sadness lengthens Romeo's hours?’
Tells Romeo it was his parents and asks him directly what is wrong. (Straight to the point)
BENVOLIO ‘In love?’
Questions Romeo further. (Question gently)
BENVOLIO ‘Of love?’
Needs to know exactly the problem (directly questions with gentle guise.)
BENVOLIO ‘Alas, that love, so gentle in his view,
Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!’
Trying to explain what Romeo thinks he feels is not so. (Explaining gently)

BENVOLIO ‘No, coz, I rather weep.’
Saying that the situation is sad not funny. He is showing sympathy towards Romeo while leading him to see his error in his melancholy. (Sad but also sarcastic)
BENVOLIO ‘At thy good heart's oppression’
Sympathy towards what his cousin feels. Although it is wrong and misjudged as Romeo lusts not loves. He is saying what is effecting you affects all those close to him. Yet Romeo cannot see this.( Bluntly.)
BENVOLIO ‘Soft! I will go along; An if you leave me so, you do me wrong.’
Saying if Romeo leaves Benvolio now he is being unfair. He wants to help Romeo and to walk away is to slap him in the face, a disgrace. ( Warning)

BENVOLIO ‘Tell me in sadness, who is that you love.’
Again he questions Romeo to the exact cause of his grief, if Romeo himself cannot say then this deeply sad man who look like Romeo must say it is a serious matter for all concerend. (directly but friendly questioning him)
BENVOLIO ‘Groan! why, no.But sadly tell me who’
Now knows Romeo is lovesick or at least Romeo thinks he is.. Now to find out who is the object and cause of this misery? (Exasperated at how hard it is to gain the information)
BENVOLIO ‘I aim'd so near, when I supposed you loved.’
Tells Romeo it was what he suspected, but as to what he does not know. that he must know (frustrated)
BENVOLIO ‘A right fair mark, fair coz, is soonest hit.’
Knows now but still a vital piece is missing as to exactly whom. (Jesting to disguise the frustration)
BENVOLIO ‘Then she hath sworn that she will still live chaste?
Realises that it is a one sided love and now plans to steer Romeo away from his current feeling. (Concerned)
BENVOLIO ‘Be ruled by me, forget to think of her.’
Tells Romeo forget her, she isn’t worth this pain, there are other fish in the sea,( sensitively blunt and to the point)
BENVOLIO ‘By giving liberty unto thine eyes; Examine other beauties.’
Explains how to move on, by seeing what is really around him not what Romeo is blinded to.( look here this is how ok, don’t be so stupid)

BENVOLIO ‘I'll pay that doctrine, or else die in debt’
He is saying I will teach Romeo a lesson one way or another not for want of trying. (To the point but happily in tone a camaraderie and relief

Did I get the interpretation correct or fail miserably and the bard is now turning in his grave. :(

Guest

Post by Guest »

This is now done and dusted I got an A for it. I would like to thank the few who patiently re-enacted parts with me via Pal Talk. Although Juliet with a Baritone voice was something else and a drag queen over camp voiced effect Mercuito had me in fits:D It helped immensely. Thank you.:D :D Charley was a help too, which was surprising. :o :D Other sites helped out and I was glad of the help offered by them and those here. Especially hose who were wiling to speak the parts and put up with my falling over my tongue speaking. :oops:

Those that helped I salute you , those who were told not to for some false conspiracy tale tale. How very sad for you I feel. :( :evil:

I got the intonations right for the character parts. Though unexpected I had more parts to do than expected, I still enjoyed myself. Only 2 of us, me being one, had main parts, which is why we got the highest scores. The others, bar one who had dyslexia and was too embarrassed to say to the Teacher, sat like stuffed peppers and did nothing. Only when the Teacher made them they did their parts and badly too, very mono-tonal.

I even did Mercutio's Queen Mab and his death scene. At one point I read a whole page as I chose to do the characters to fill in the gaps. Hard word but I very much enjoyed it. Sadly now no more speaking just loads of writing which is not my strong point.

Never realised how sexual some of the puns were in parts of the play. ;) I glowed for red for the world reading them out.

Again thank you all those who actively helped me, regardless of.
I bid you adieu.:D

Skeptica you can delete this if you like I have finished with it. Unless anybody wants to continue it that is?

Loon
Posts: 1593
Joined: Sat Jun 05, 2004 7:25 am
Location: Tokyo

Post by Loon »

Fluffy wrote:This is now done and dusted I got an A for it.
:BananaCheers:

Fluffy wrote: I would like to thank the few who patiently re-enacted parts with me via Pal Talk.
Fluffy was on Paltalk? :HairRaising:
I guess there he chose to err on the side of more votes. -[size=75]Grammatron[/size]

Guest

Post by Guest »

Loon wrote:
Fluffy wrote:This is now done and dusted I got an A for it.
:BananaCheers:

Fluffy wrote: I would like to thank the few who patiently re-enacted parts with me via Pal Talk.
Fluffy was on Paltalk? :HairRaising:
Oh yes I was. :D