Cool astronomy photos

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sparks
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Wed Dec 12, 2018 5:23 am

I suppose so but I never took them for economically challenged, and by that I mean that when we (USA!USA!!) went to the moon, the best and first reason to do it was international prestige and to show those fuckin' commies who the hell ran the fucking show. A goal worthy of all the money spent and lives lost.

Now, our Chinese comrades are going after the far side and it's a given that they have the money to do so since they're not sending a human(s). I guess what I can't buy is that they're doing it just because they're curious.

Call me suspicious, but I'm thinking there's an ulterior motive here. And it has nothing to do with the dipshit notion of launching missiles. They're after something.

My money is on the (presumed on my part) fact that they don't want to be left out of what's happening on Mars. Far side of the moon would be a good starting point for them.

Need an EpIC!! LEveL conspiracy theory? Governments worldwide know that we're fucked due to climate change and those with the money and technical ability are unwilling to allow a Mars Settlement Gap!!11Eleventy :)
You can lead them to knowledge, but you can't make them think.

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Wed Dec 12, 2018 1:08 pm



Never noticed these stripes on the sun (look quite like the clouds of Venus in UV).

Another, slower, recent one:

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Rob Lister
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Rob Lister » Wed Dec 12, 2018 1:17 pm

Witness wrote:
Wed Dec 12, 2018 12:41 am
Here’s why China’s launch to the far side of the Moon is a big deal

This may be aprecursor for a space race back to the Moon.
Funking tabloid media. What's the point of the instigation? Besides, it's going to be hard for them to win a race that was already won 50 years before they even mosied up to the starting line.

But I applaud their endeavor to further explore.
If successful, this mission will carry out several lines of important scientific research on the still somewhat unknown far unlanded upon side of the Moon.
A nit worth picking?
China has not said when it will attempt to land on the far side of the Moon, ... Chang'e-4 will have to link up with the Queqiao relay spacecraft, which will have line-of-sight communications with both the lander, which is expected to set down in the South Pole-Aitken Basin, as well as Earth.
That's pretty cool. Of course, there will be blackout periods on every orbit but I figure with an elliptical enough orbit, maybe less than 10% of the orbit. It would be fun to work that out exactly ... but also too fucking hard.

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Thu Dec 13, 2018 12:33 am

Rob Lister wrote:
Wed Dec 12, 2018 1:17 pm
Funking tabloid media.
Wholeheartedly agree! :figamagee:

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Sat Dec 15, 2018 12:29 am

For our resident astronomers:
How to see 2018’s brightest comet

Have you heard about comet 46P/Wirtanen? It passes closest to the sun on December 12, 2018, and closest to Earth just a few days later, on December 16. Comet Wirtanen is the brightest comet in the night sky now; it’s the brightest comet of 2018. Although theoretically visible to the eye now, this comet is not easily visible to the eye.

Image
Details & links: https://earthsky.org/space/46p-wirtanen ... e-dec-2018

Image

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Anaxagoras
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Tue Dec 18, 2018 6:34 am

Witness posted a GIF of this a couple pages back, but here's a higher-res still image:

Image
This mosaic image, composed of 12 Polycam images collected on December 2, 2018, and provided by NASA, shows the asteroid Bennu. NASA's first look at a tiny asteroid shows that the space rock is more moist and studded with boulders than originally thought. On December 10, scientists released the first morsels of data collected since their spacecraft Osiris-Rex hooked up last week with the asteroid, which is only about three blocks wide and weighs about 80 million tons. Bennu regularly crosses Earth's orbit and will come perilously close to Earth in about 150 years.
More photos here
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Bruce
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Bruce » Tue Dec 18, 2018 11:17 am

When I think of asteroids, I don't think "moist", but thanks to this article, I will now. :( :( :( :x :x :x
Such potential!

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Bruce
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Bruce » Tue Dec 18, 2018 11:22 am

Name three things that are moist.

1. Disposable towellets
2. Good chocolate cake
3. Asteroids

Thanks NASA. :evil:
Such potential!

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Tue Dec 18, 2018 11:43 am

Can't please everyone. But remember that much of the water on earth came from asteroids and comets that bombarded the planet in the early days. Or at least that's how some theories go I think. Too lazy to look it up right now.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Wed Dec 19, 2018 5:11 am

Bruce wrote:
Tue Dec 18, 2018 11:17 am
When I think of asteroids, I don't think "moist", but thanks to this article, I will now. :( :( :( :x :x :x
Always complainin'. Don't you see that it's a giant, crunchy, awesome cookie? :roll:

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Bruce
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Bruce » Wed Dec 19, 2018 11:27 am

Anaxagoras wrote:
Tue Dec 18, 2018 11:43 am
Can't please everyone. But remember that much of the water on earth came from asteroids and comets that bombarded the planet in the early days. Or at least that's how some theories go I think. Too lazy to look it up right now.
That theory lost some popularity when we landed a probe on that comet a few years ago. The isotopic ratios in the hydrogen and oxygen didn't match those on earth. I don't know why that matters because comets get bombarded by radiation for billions of years that we are shielded from on earth due to our magnetic field, so of course the isotopic ratios are going to be different.
Such potential!

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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Wed Dec 19, 2018 11:47 pm

An oldie but goodie.

Best viewed full screen with sound off.

Image "If I turn in a sicko, will I get a reward?"

"Yes! A BIG REWARD!" ====> Click here to turn in a sicko
Any man writes a mission statement spends a night in the box.
-- our mission statement plappendale

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Thu Dec 20, 2018 1:15 am

Bruce wrote:
Wed Dec 19, 2018 11:27 am
That theory lost some popularity when we landed a probe on that comet a few years ago. The isotopic ratios in the hydrogen and oxygen didn't match those on earth. I don't know why that matters because comets get bombarded by radiation for billions of years that we are shielded from on earth due to our magnetic field, so of course the isotopic ratios are going to be different.
I wonder, is there really a spallation process producing hydrogen (i. e. protons) or one of its isotopes?

As for the different isotopic contents in the Solar System and their (multiple!) causes, there is a long discussion thread here: https://www.researchgate.net/post/What_ ... lar_System

I extract the first post:
Christian Vollmer
University of Münster

Isotopic anomalies in solar system objects can be due to 1) nucleosynthetic effects, i.e., material that has been synthesized in other stars and preserved in presolar stardust grains, 2) molecular cloud fractionation effects at very low temperatures that have been preserved in very primitive organic matter as H-C-N anomalies, 3) anomalies in short-lived radionuclides like 26Al that are due to their different decay at different times after solar system formation, 4) cosmogenic effects due to exposure to the galactic high energy environment (e.g., spallation reactions), 5) Anomalies in oxygen isotopes that are due to CO self shielding under UV irradiation of the young Sun (mass-independent fractionation), and 6) mass dependent fractionation. The question is to what composition you want to refer your anomalies. For instance, the Earth and most meteoritic materials are isotopically anomalous in N and O with respect to the Sun (see results by the GENESIS mission)!




Now for an astronomical seasonal snowman:

Image
Sometimes it's all about perspective. This very convincing image of a conjoined moon masquerading as a snowman is actually two separate Saturnian moons – Dione and Rhea – taken from such an angle by the international Cassini spacecraft that they appear as one.

Dione (top) was actually closer to the spacecraft at the time the image was taken, at around 1.1 million kilometres, compared to Rhea (bottom) which was around 1.6 million kilometres from Cassini. Dione has a diameter of 1123 kilometres and Rhea is larger with a diameter of 1528 kilometres, but they appear to have a similar size in this image due to the difference in distance.

The moons also orbit Saturn at different distances: Dione lies at roughly the same distance as the Moon from the Earth and orbits around the ringed planet in just 2.7 days, while Rhea sits slightly further away and has a 4.5 day orbit.
https://phys.org/news/2018-12-image-dione-rhea.html

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Bruce
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Bruce » Thu Dec 20, 2018 2:56 am

Thanks. Cool stuff.

I still think water came from comets. However, it's not like these comets land, melted, and gave us oceans. It was probably more like millions of years of explosive impacts that blasted water vapor into space, which was then slowly pulled back into earth's orbit.
Such potential!

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Thu Dec 20, 2018 5:14 pm

Image
NASA's InSight spacecraft, its heat shield and its parachute were imaged on Dec. 6 and 11 by the HiRISE camera onboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
On Nov. 26, NASA's InSight mission knew the spacecraft touched down within an 81-mile-long (130-kilometer-long) landing ellipse on Mars. Now, the team has pinpointed InSight's exact location using images from HiRISE, a powerful camera onboard another NASA spacecraft, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 204347.htm

There's no privacy anywhere anymore. :|

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Fri Dec 21, 2018 3:35 am

No spectacular pictures, but:
It’s the Solar System’s Most Distant Object. Astronomers Named It Farout.

Orbiting 11 billion miles from the sun, this tiny world offers additional clues in the search for the proposed Planet Nine.

Astronomers have discovered a far-out world circling the sun.

How far out? It’s so far out that the discoverers nicknamed it “Farout.” All they can see is a pinkish dot of light in the night sky, but that is enough to infer that they are looking at a 300-mile ice ball orbiting more than 11 billion miles from the sun — more than three times as far out as Pluto, and the farthest object ever observed within the solar system.

It is the latest revelation in a distant region that was once expected to be empty, and studying its trajectory may help point to an as-yet-unseen ninth planet circling the sun far beyond Neptune.

On Monday, the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Center announced the discovery and gave this object the designation 2018 VG18.

“Last month, we came across it moving very, very slow,” said Scott S. Sheppard of the Carnegie Institution for Science, one of the discoverers of VG18. “Immediately we knew it was an interesting object.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/17/scie ... ystem.html (more details)

Image
Farout was observed by the Subaru Telescope, on Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii, on Nov. 10.In the hour between exposures, the object moved relative to the background stars and galaxies.
CreditScott S. Sheppard and David Tholen/Carnegie Institution for Science

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Fri Dec 21, 2018 2:29 pm

Stunning Photos Show Huge Crater on Mars Absolutely Brimming With Water Ice

The Mars orbiter has obtained a stunning view of a feature called the Korolev crater, an 81.4-kilometre (50.6-mile) diameter crater just south of the Olympia Undae dunes circling the northern polar cap. The crater is filled almost to the brim with pristine ice year-round.

Like Earth, Mars does have seasons. And like Earth, the warmer seasons result in receding ice. But Korolev crater, created by a massive impact sometime in Mars's distant past, and named for Soviet rocket engineer Sergei Korolev, is a bit of an oddball.

It's a type of geological feature known as a 'cold trap', and that's exactly what it sounds like. The floor of the crater is very deep, just over 2 kilometres (1.2 miles) below the rim. From the floor of the crater rises a dome of water ice, 1.8 km (1.1 miles) thick and up to 60 km (37.3 miles) in diameter.

In volume, it contains around 2,200 cubic kilometres (528 cubic miles) of ice (although an unknown proportion of it is probably Mars dust).
https://www.sciencealert.com/a-mars-sat ... artian-ice

Image

Image

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Grammatron » Mon Dec 24, 2018 5:28 pm

"Photos"

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sparks
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Tue Dec 25, 2018 1:17 am

You're making a point?
You can lead them to knowledge, but you can't make them think.

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Tue Dec 25, 2018 1:37 am

Witness wrote:
Sat Dec 15, 2018 12:29 am
For our resident astronomers:
How to see 2018’s brightest comet
Image

Technical details: https://old.reddit.com/r/Astronomy/comm ... comet_46p/
Timelapse: https://www.instagram.com/p/BriLUbzDN0I/