Cool astronomy photos

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Rob Lister
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Rob Lister »

Witness wrote:
Sat Apr 11, 2020 2:33 pm
NASA dreams big:
Direct Multipixel Imaging and Spectroscopy of an Exoplanet with a Solar Gravitational Lens Mission
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/space ... Exoplanet/ for the details.

tl;dr: get a telescope far away enough to use the sun for gravitational lensing.
I thought this seemed familiar.

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=33009&p=949430&hili ... ns#p949430

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Another NASA project:
Lunar Crater Radio Telescope (LCRT) on the Far-Side of the Moon

Image

An ultra-long-wavelength radio telescope on the far-side of the Moon has tremendous advantages compared to Earth-based and Earth-orbiting telescopes, including: (i) Such a telescope can observe the universe at wavelengths greater than 10m (i.e., frequencies below 30MHz), which are reflected by the Earth's ionosphere and are hitherto largely unexplored by humans, and (ii) the Moon acts as a physical shield that isolates the lunar-surface telescope from radio interferences/noises from Earth-based sources, ionosphere, Earth-orbiting satellites, and Sun’s radio-noise during the lunar night. We propose to deploy a 1km-diameter wire-mesh using wallclimbing DuAxel robots in a 3-5km-diameter lunar crater on the far-side, with suitable depth-to-diameter ratio, to form a sphericalcap reflector. This Lunar Crater Radio Telescope (LCRT), with 1km diameter, will be the largest filled-aperture radio telescope in the Solar System! LCRT could enable tremendous scientific discoveries in the field of cosmology by observing the early universe in the 10– 50m wavelength band (i.e., 6–30MHz frequency band), which has not been explored by humans till-date.

Image
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/space ... telescope/

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Rob Lister
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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I like that very much. Without thinking too hard, rather than tow the wires across the crater, fire them over like a mortar shell. The lack of atmosphere would enable pretty precise placement. The energy necessary to do it would be trivial.
“(Siegel) found that, assuming the golfing astronaut knew how to adjust his approach to properly take advantage of the Moon's environment, he could easily hit the ball 2.5 miles. Perhaps even more amazingly, the ball would likely stay in the air for about 70 seconds before finally coming to a rest.
Alan Shepard would be proud.

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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↑ How do you make sure the lines anchor correctly each time?

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Rob Lister
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Rob Lister »

Witness wrote:
Mon Apr 13, 2020 10:17 pm
↑ How do you make sure the lines anchor correctly each time?
Robots do that. Or that chick they plan on sending. Whatever.

But that part of the mission--traversing the crater--probably represents the greatest risk. Circumnavigating it, not so much.

Either way I see it as doable and useful. I'll write the head of NASA and tell him I approve.

ETA: Then again, why the need to put the receiver in a gravity well? Why not just construct it in space. It couldn't possible be more complicated or expensive than the James Webb boondoggle. Musk could do it in a month!

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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30 Years, 30 Images

We're sharing one captivating image per day from each of Hubble’s years in orbit to count down to Hubble’s 30th anniversary on April 24, 2020.

Image
Lots more pics, in big sizes you can zoom in: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasahubbl ... 3228021437

[Bad link edited.]

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Fid
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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So so many dick pics... but that may just be me.
... The stars were suns, but so far away they were just little points of light ... The scale of the universe suddenly opened up to me. It was a kind of religious experience. There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me.
Carl Sagan

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Fid
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Some folks are up to no good in a few years regarding Mercury.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... l_2020.gif
... The stars were suns, but so far away they were just little points of light ... The scale of the universe suddenly opened up to me. It was a kind of religious experience. There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me.
Carl Sagan

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Witness wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 12:13 am
Comet ATLAS may soon be visible to the naked eye
Bad news:
The shattered heart of comet C/2019 Y4 ATLAS

Image

After observations suggesting the presence of fragments in the inner coma of C/2019 Y4 ATLAS, we imaged this comet every night. In particular, tonight we observed at least three fragments, telling that the comet really experienced a breakup event. Here it is in our image.

The image above comes from the average of 63, 60-seconds exposures, remotely taken with the “Elena” robotic unit (PlaneWave 17″+Paramount ME+SBIG STL-6303E) available at Virtual Telescope in Rome. The telescope tracked the apparent motion of the comet and images were stacked using the orbit of the comet, to provide the best accuracy. Image scale is 0.63″/pixel. No image processing was performed, to preserve the reliability of the visible features. The signal-to-noise ratio is quite good, so it is possible to do, carefully, some image processing.

In the upper left insert, you can see the central region, this time after applying an unsharp masking filtering: there are at least four fragments there, telling us the comet broke up for sure, this causing the evident fading trend of the object.
https://earthsky.org/todays-image/the-s ... 9-y4-atlas

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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And good news:
NASA's Curiosity Keeps Rolling As Team Operates Rover From Home

Image

For people who are able to work remotely during this time of social distancing, video conferences and emails have helped bridge the gap. The same holds true for the team behind NASA's Curiosity Mars rover. They're dealing with the same challenges of so many remote workers — quieting the dog, sharing space with partners and family, remembering to step away from the desk from time to time — but with a twist: They're operating on Mars.

On March 20, 2020, nobody on the team was present at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, where the mission is based. It was the first time the rover's operations were planned while the team was completely remote. Two days later, the commands they had sent to Mars executed as expected, resulting in Curiosity drilling a rock sample at a location called "Edinburgh."

The team began to anticipate the need to go fully remote a couple weeks before, leading them to rethink how they would operate. Headsets, monitors and other equipment were distributed (picked up curbside, with all employees following proper social-distancing measures).

Not everything they're used to working with at JPL could be sent home, however: Planners rely on 3D images from Mars and usually study them through special goggles that rapidly shift between left- and right-eye views to better reveal the contours of the landscape. That helps them figure out where to drive Curiosity and how far they can extend its robotic arm.

But those goggles require the advanced graphics cards in high-performance computers at JPL (they're actually gaming computers repurposed for driving on Mars). In order for rover operators to view 3D images on ordinary laptops, they've switched to simple red-blue 3D glasses. Although not as immersive or comfortable as the goggles, they work just as well for planning drives and arm movements.

The team ran through several tests and one full practice run before it was time to plan the "Edinburgh" drilling operation.
https://mars.nasa.gov/news/8647/nasas-c ... from-home/

Driving the faithful robot from home, cool! :)

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness »

Messier 14 star cluster:

Image

Details if interested: http://www.messier.seds.org/m/m014.html

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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred »

Cool.

But really not all that messy. :p
Image "If I turn in a sicko, will I get a reward?"

"Yes! A BIG REWARD!" ====> Click here to turn in a sicko
The arc of the moral universe bends towards chaos.
People who believe God or History are on their side provide the chaos.

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Abdul Alhazred wrote:
Fri Apr 17, 2020 11:47 am
But really not all that messy. :p
I get the (somewhat lame) pun, but think of it: they all orbit the center of gravity but as the cluster is not flattened like a galaxy there is no common plane where they do that. The orbital mechanics must be horrendous – would you want our solar system to be part of that?

From their Wiki page:
The results of N-body simulations have shown that the stars can follow unusual paths through the cluster, often forming loops and often falling more directly toward the core than would a single star orbiting a central mass. In addition, due to interactions with other stars that result in an increase in velocity, some of the stars gain sufficient energy to escape the cluster. Over long periods of time this will result in a dissipation of the cluster, a process termed evaporation. The typical time scale for the evaporation of a globular cluster is 1010 years. In 2010 it became possible to directly compute, star by star, N-body simulations of a globular cluster over the course of its lifetime.

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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred »

So really messy after all. 8)
Image "If I turn in a sicko, will I get a reward?"

"Yes! A BIG REWARD!" ====> Click here to turn in a sicko
The arc of the moral universe bends towards chaos.
People who believe God or History are on their side provide the chaos.

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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred »

Just Another Day on Aerosol Earth
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap200418.html
Explanation: It was just another day on aerosol Earth. For August 23, 2018, the identification and distribution of aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere is shown in this dramatic, planet-wide digital visualization. Produced in real time, the Goddard Earth Observing System Forward Processing (GEOS FP) model relies on a combination of Earth-observing satellite and ground-based data to calculate the presence of types of aerosols, tiny solid particles and liquid droplets, as they circulate above the entire planet. This August 23rd model shows black carbon particles in red from combustion processes, like smoke from the fires in the United States and Canada, spreading across large stretches of North America and Africa. Sea salt aerosols are in blue, swirling above threatening typhoons near South Korea and Japan, and the hurricane looming near Hawaii. Dust shown in purple hues is blowing over African and Asian deserts. The location of cities and towns can be found from the concentrations of lights based on satellite image data of the Earth at night.
Click to view. 8)
Image "If I turn in a sicko, will I get a reward?"

"Yes! A BIG REWARD!" ====> Click here to turn in a sicko
The arc of the moral universe bends towards chaos.
People who believe God or History are on their side provide the chaos.

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness »



USA!USA!USA!

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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred »

Best viewed full screen sound off. :)

Cassini Approaches Saturn
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap200419.html
Image "If I turn in a sicko, will I get a reward?"

"Yes! A BIG REWARD!" ====> Click here to turn in a sicko
The arc of the moral universe bends towards chaos.
People who believe God or History are on their side provide the chaos.

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Fid
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap200419.html

So much data to be recovered with modern techniques .
... The stars were suns, but so far away they were just little points of light ... The scale of the universe suddenly opened up to me. It was a kind of religious experience. There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me.
Carl Sagan

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Fid
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Shakes fist impotently at Abdul for beating me to this!
... The stars were suns, but so far away they were just little points of light ... The scale of the universe suddenly opened up to me. It was a kind of religious experience. There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me.
Carl Sagan

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Fid
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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That is one of the most beautiful sights I have seen.
... The stars were suns, but so far away they were just little points of light ... The scale of the universe suddenly opened up to me. It was a kind of religious experience. There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me.
Carl Sagan