Amusing Science

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Witness
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Re: Amusing Science

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Image
Cosmic ray transmission muography of a full/empty water tower

Muons are negatively-charged particles similar to electrons but about 207 times heavier. Random cosmic/cosmic-ray-plus-atmosphere-generated muons naturally bombard the Earth all the time and they can penetrate hundreds, up to thousands of meters of solid rock.

Considering the penetrative power of muons, this is a rather "easy" application: a concrete water tower with and without water, after 4-day exposures using a small (0.25 m2) sensor downstream of the tower. Other ways of imaging use multiple sensors on both front/back of the object, or all on one side, or can measure deviation of muons instead of absorption.
Same technique used on the Pyramids. :wink:
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Re: Amusing Science

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Linguistics: learn some sign language.

Image

:mrgreen:
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Toothbrush holder in bathroom turns out to be a jar from Indus Valley civilisation

Antiquities expert James Brenchley said the object was an Indus Valley civilisation pottery jar dating back to 1900 BC.

Image

Based in Derby in the west Midlands, Karl Martin, who bought the jar at a car-boot sale with another pot for £4, was told of its antiquity by a colleague at the local auctioneers, Hansons. The jar with a painting of an antelope was put for auction this week, selling for £80.

A keen collector, Martin said: “I liked it straight away. I used it in the bathroom to store my toothpaste and toothbrush – it even ended up getting a few toothpaste marks on it. I suspected it might be very old but forgot all about it”.

“Then, one day at work, I was helping Hansons’ antiquities expert James Brenchley unload a van and noticed some pottery which was similar to my toothbrush pot. The painting style looked the same and it had similar crudely-painted animal figures”.

“I rescued the pot from my bathroom and asked him to examine it for me. He confirmed it was a genuine antiquity from Afghanistan and dated back to 1900 BC. That means it’s around 4,000 years old – made 2,000 years before Christ was born. It’s amazing, really. How it ended up at a South Derbyshire car-boot sale, I’ll never know”.

Brenchley said: “This is an Indus Valley-Harappan civilisation pottery jar dating back to 1900 BC. This was a Bronze Age civilisation mainly in the north western regions of South Asia. The civilisation was primarily located in modern-day India and Pakistan as well as Afghanistan.”
https://www.hindustantimes.com/world-ne ... ECcJP.html
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Re: Amusing Science

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Hope I did the tags right.
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Re: Amusing Science

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A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare (probably Socrates originally)
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Re: Amusing Science

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Abdul Alhazred wrote: Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:24 pm
Anaxagoras wrote: Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:44 am Hope I did the tags right.
I see nothing.

Got an http link I can follow?
https://gfycat.com/dizzyhandycattle
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Re: Amusing Science

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Lactating spiders:
Prolonged milk provisioning in a jumping spider

Abstract

Lactation is a mammalian attribute, and the few known nonmammal examples have distinctly different modalities. We document here milk provisioning in a jumping spider, which compares functionally and behaviorally to lactation in mammals. The spiderlings ingest nutritious milk droplets secreted from the mother’s epigastric furrow until the subadult stage. Milk is indispensable for offspring survival in the early stages and complements their foraging in later stages. Maternal care, as for some long-lived vertebrates, continues after the offspring reach maturity. Furthermore, a female-biased adult sex ratio is acquired only when the mother is present. These findings demonstrate that mammal-like milk provisioning and parental care for sexually mature offspring have also evolved in invertebrates, encouraging a reevaluation of their occurrence across the animal kingdom, especially in invertebrates.
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6418/1052 (rest behind paywall)
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↑ Going slightly farther back in time, the cosmic origins of the elements:

Image
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File ... _table.svg
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Re: Amusing Science

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Witness wrote: Thu Dec 20, 2018 1:19 am ↑ Going slightly farther back in time, the cosmic origins of the elements:

Image
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File ... _table.svg
It's amazing to me if you stop to think about what sorts of calculations would be necessary to figure all of this stuff out. Completely beyond me.

But like, they can predict what kinds of elements would be created inside a nova or a supernova, or an exploding white dwarf, or two neutron stars colliding. :notsure:
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Re: Amusing Science

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Or the Big Bang. Gamow did that quite some time ago.
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Re: Amusing Science

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The formation of hydrogen was an amazing cosmological balancing act. If things had leaned one way, then there would have been no matter at all, just expanding energy. If things had leaned the other way, then the big bang would have collapsed back into a singularity. Di-atomic hydrogen just happens to be the perfect balance between attractive and repulsive forces. Just enough repulsion between the two protons to keep them from slamming into one another, and just enough attraction between the protons and electrons to keep them from flying apart.

That reminds me.....my 20 year anniversary is tomorrow. I suppose I better pick up something for Mrs Bruce on the way home. :shock:
Such potential!
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Re: Amusing Science

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The only ones that are not naturally occurring have half lives that are extremely short. Fractions of a second. I think they do occur naturally but they just don't last long. Plutonium on the other hand has several isotopes with long half lives.
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Abdul Alhazred wrote: Thu Dec 20, 2018 10:06 am I note that naturally occurring plutonium exists.

Didn't know that.
Any naturally occurring Plutonium on Earth would long ago decayed into something else before we showed up to claim it for weapons use. So, while it does occur naturally, there is none on our planet. Wonder how often neutron stars merge? Before the Pu can get much of anywhere, it's decayed to something else.

Interesting study though. I was under the impression that all the elements were synthesized in super nova. With the exception of H and He.
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Re: Amusing Science

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There is one known case of a natural nuclear reactor:
Wikipedia wrote:A natural nuclear fission reactor is a uranium deposit where self-sustaining nuclear chain reactions have occurred. This can be examined by analysis of isotope ratios. The existence of this phenomenon was discovered in 1972 at Oklo in Gabon by French physicist Francis Perrin. The conditions under which a natural nuclear reactor could exist had been predicted in 1956 by Paul Kazuo Kuroda. The conditions found were very similar to what was predicted.

Oklo is the only known location for this in the world and consists of 16 sites at which self-sustaining nuclear fission reactions are thought to have taken place approximately 1.7 billion years ago, and ran for a few hundred thousand years, averaging probably less than 100 kW of thermal power during that time.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_n ... on_reactor

It's old, so the produced plutonium has disintegrated since.

For a lot of quacks it's Ancient Aliens™, of course.
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Re: Amusing Science

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Forgot about that one Witness. Thanks!
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Image

Gravitational waves! :shock:
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Hmmm... Searching for a title. "Popular rocket science"? "Thai space program"?



But 'tis awesome! :)
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In 1908 Dr Ludovic O’Followell published a treatise on Corsets. Tu illustrate the health dangers he had X-rays made:

Image

Image

More: http://www.laboiteverte.fr/les-corsets- ... s-x/?l=sb1
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Re: Amusing Science

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Those are some child bearing hips.
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Re: Amusing Science

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Did you mean 'birthing' hips?

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Take that, entropy! :mrgreen:
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Full rainbow:
Sorry Anax, doesn't work without the webm tags. We need something to get the size under control...

Link added: https://external-preview.redd.it/mp4/uS ... 57ba28e8f9
Last edited by Witness on Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Amusing Science

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Alternatively just a plain old link works for me. Either in the url tags or just the url itself if it doesn't auto-embed. I don't mind clicking.
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OK, I'll add the link. (The bbVideo tag doesn't work either.)
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Re: Amusing Science

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Worth a read (trust me):

http://geobeck.tripod.com/frontier/planet.htm

(there's a few typos along the way, but you should probably be able to decipher it.)
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Re: Amusing Science

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Honk!

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Sans Forgetica is a downloadable font that is scientifically designed to help you remember your study notes.
https://sansforgetica.rmit/



Can't say I'm really convinced – and it looks ugly as sin. :|
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Re: Amusing Science

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Image
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Re: Amusing Science

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One more fucking time: Knock of the autoplaying bullshit.

This shit is really annoying. Please make it stop.

I do not want to click on a thread that has new posts and be flooded with a big ration of bullshit audio from all the crap that has been posted (mostly from Vimeo) that immediately begins to autoplay with the goddamned motherfucking audio up and unmuted.

Pay attention to what you're fucking doing peeps.

Now, on the other hand, is there a way to block entire threads wholesale? Maybe that could fucking well work. :)

Block Vimeo from autoplaying. That is the answer.
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Re: Amusing Science

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"I refer the honorable gentleman to the answer I gave previously."

--J.D.
Mob of the Mean: Free beanie, cattle-prod and Charley Fan Club!
"Doctor X is just treating you the way he treats everyone--as subhuman crap too dumb to breathe in after you breathe out." – Don
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"Doctor X wins again." – Pyrrho
"Never sorry to make a racist Fucktard cry." – His Humble MagNIfIcence
"It was the criticisms of Doc X, actually, that let me see more clearly how far the hypocrisy had gone." – clarsct
"I'd leave it up to Doctor X who has been a benevolent tyrant so far." – Grammatron
"Indeed you are a river to your people.
Shit. That's going to end up in your sig." – Pyrrho
"Try a twelve step program and accept Doctor X as your High Power." – asthmatic camel
"just like Doc X said." – gnome

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Re: Amusing Science

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sparks wrote: Tue Jan 29, 2019 6:25 am One more fucking time: Knock of the autoplaying bullshit.
Some people seem to have this problem with the latest Firefox (that your browser?).

You can try this: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefo ... -autoplay/
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Re: Amusing Science

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If you want to search for place names (not only the US of A): https://ssz.fr/places/#//

As an example, names ending in -shire or -ham:

Image

The map is active, you'll get the complete name by clicking.
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Re: Amusing Science

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A new take on the old iron filings:
https://i.imgur.com/hxuzRlZ.gifv
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Nanotechnology makes it possible for mice to see in infrared

Mice with vision enhanced by nanotechnology were able to see infrared light as well as visible light, reports a study published February 28 in the journal Cell. A single injection of nanoparticles in the mice's eyes bestowed infrared vision for up to 10 weeks with minimal side effects, allowing them to see infrared light even during the day and with enough specificity to distinguish between different shapes. These findings could lead to advancements in human infrared vision technologies, including potential applications in civilian encryption, security, and military operations.

Humans and other mammals are limited to seeing a range of wavelengths of light called visible light, which includes the wavelengths of the rainbow. But infrared radiation, which has a longer wavelength, is all around us. People, animals and objects emit infrared light as they give off heat, and objects can also reflect infrared light.
https://phys.org/news/2019-02-nanotechn ... rared.html

Don't confuse near infrared which the mice could see (~ 0.9 μm) and thermal radiation (~ 10 μm at 300 K).