Amusing Science

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Witness
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Re: Amusing Science

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ceptimus wrote: Wed Aug 05, 2020 11:26 pm Does the fungus actually have any medicinal value? Or is it just over-hyped and over-priced bullshit snake oil, like most other "traditional medicines" and "alternative therapies"?
Here's a quote:
Development & Modification of Bioactivity

Examples of other drug leads

Numerous examples of new wonder drugs regularly hit the media. It is unlikely that they stand up to such claims, and they regularly highlight the problems associated with poorly defined and characterized starting material. Two examples highlight the core issues.

Cordyceps sinensis104 is a medicinal fungus of TCM. It is a parasite on the larvae of moths (Lepidoptera) of the genera Hepialus and Thitarodes endemic to alpine habitats (3600–5000 m in elevation) on the Tibetan plateau in southwestern China. In China, C. sinensis has a long history of medicinal use. It is thought to have been discovered 2000 years ago with the first formally documented use coming from the Bencao Congxin (New Compilation of Materia Medica) in the Qing dynasty in 1757. Overall, little primary ethnomedical data describing the medical uses of C. sinensis exist in the literature. Current ethnomedical reports are limited to the use as a general tonic in China and as an aphrodisiac in Nepal. Cordyceps sinensis first gained worldwide attention when it was revealed that several Chinese runners who broke world records in 1993 had included this fungus as part of their training program.
On this page: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/ag ... s-sinensis

From another paper:
Over 30 different bioactivities have been reported for O. sinensis, including (1) immunomodulatory, (2) immunosuppressive, (3) anticomplementary, (4) antitumor, (5) anti-inflammatory, (6) antioxidant, (7) antibacterial, (8) hepatoprotection, (9) kidney benefitting, (10) antidiabetes, (11) hypocholesterolemia, (12) antiarteriosclerosis, (13) antithrombus, (14) hypotension and vasorelaxant, (15) lung benefitting, (16) photoprotection, (17) antidepression, (18) antiosteoporosis, (19) anticerebral ischemia, (20) antifatigue, (21) antiasthma, (22) steroidogenesis, (23) erythropoiesis, (24) antiarrhythmia, (25) antiaging, (26) testosterone production, (27) sedation, and (28) adjunction, as well as the ability to do the following: (29) prevent and treat injury to the bowel, (30) promote endurance capacity, (31) improve learning-memory, (32) prevent allograft rejection, and (33) attenuate lupus.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3924981/

So broad an activity, I'd say placebo.

The fungus craze has also a deep effect on the populations harvesting it, on the landscapes (apparently they don't manage it too well), and as it happens that's where the snow leopard lives…
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Witness
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Re: Amusing Science

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Scientists rename human genes to stop Microsoft Excel from misreading them as dates

There are tens of thousands of genes in the human genome: minuscule twists of DNA and RNA that combine to express all of the traits and characteristics that make each of us unique. Each gene is given a name and alphanumeric code, known as a symbol, which scientists use to coordinate research. But over the past year or so, some 27 human genes have been renamed, all because Microsoft Excel kept misreading their symbols as dates.

The problem isn’t as unexpected as it first sounds. Excel is a behemoth in the spreadsheet world and is regularly used by scientists to track their work and even conduct clinical trials. But its default settings were designed with more mundane applications in mind, so when a user inputs a gene’s alphanumeric symbol into a spreadsheet, like MARCH1 — short for “Membrane Associated Ring-CH-Type Finger 1” — Excel converts that into a date: 1-Mar.
"Studies found a fifth of genetic data in papers was affected by Excel errors"

This is extremely frustrating, even dangerous, corrupting data that scientists have to sort through by hand to restore. It’s also surprisingly widespread and affects even peer-reviewed scientific work. One study from 2016 examined genetic data shared alongside 3,597 published papers and found that roughly one-fifth had been affected by Excel errors.
https://www.reporter.am/scientists-rena ... -as-dates/
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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: Amusing Science

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Why not implement a "genome" custom data type that could applied as an attribute to any range of (data) cells?

After all, you can have number or dates as "text".
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Re: Amusing Science

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Just learned an interesting factoid. Seems pretty solid. The answer is in the following video, but try to guess the answer to the following question before watching, and then you can watch and see how close your answer was to the right answer:

How many dead skin cells do you shed per hour?

And here's the video with the answer:

A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Amusing Science

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6
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Witness
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Re: Amusing Science

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Re: Amusing Science

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That’s the architectural design used to create a listening spot in a room

People talking at the one point can be heard if you are at the other point

Even in a big crowded noisy room
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Amusing Science

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There is a room like that in a Casino in the Bahamas

I remember how freaky it was

People talking thirty feet away and it was like you were right next to them
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Amusing Science

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Re: Amusing Science

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Abdul Alhazred wrote: Fri Aug 07, 2020 9:36 pm Why not implement a "genome" custom data type that could applied as an attribute to any range of (data) cells?

After all, you can have number or dates as "text".
Or simply set all the cell formatting to numeric.

Honestly, if the top scientists in this field can't figure out something so simple, doesn't it scare you to think what else we might be fucking up in the humane genome over the next few decades?
Such potential!
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Re: Amusing Science

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Witness wrote: Thu Aug 20, 2020 11:55 pm
This video makes me want to play Katamari Damaci, starting at the Planck length scale and ending with the observable universe. Father would be so proud. He might even unlock the non-observable universe as a reward.
Such potential!
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Re: Amusing Science

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How about playing with black holes, Bruce?

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Re: Amusing Science

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How cold was the ice age? Researchers now know
A University of Arizona-led team has nailed down the temperature of the last ice age—the Last Glacial Maximum of 20,000 years ago—to about 46 degrees Fahrenheit (7.8 C).
Only 20,000 years ago. Well, that's sort of a long time ago, but sort of very recent too.
Their findings allow climate scientists to better understand the relationship between today's rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide—a major greenhouse gas—and average global temperature.

The Last Glacial Maximum, or LGM, was a frigid period when huge glaciers covered about half of North America, Europe and South America and many parts of Asia, while flora and fauna that were adapted to the cold thrived.

"We have a lot of data about this time period because it has been studied for so long," said Jessica Tierney, associate professor in the UArizona Department of Geosciences. "But one question science has long wanted answers to is simple: How cold was the ice age?"

Tracking Temperature

Tierney is lead author of a paper published today in Nature that found that the average global temperature of the ice age was 6 degrees Celsius (11 F) cooler than today. For context, the average global temperature of the 20th century was 14 C (57 F).

"In your own personal experience that might not sound like a big difference, but, in fact, it's a huge change," Tierney said.

She and her team also created maps to illustrate how temperature differences varied in specific regions across the globe.
Just 6 degrees Celsius (11 F) is the difference between most of North America being covered in glaciers and the 20th century climate. And we're probably in for at least another few degrees of warming.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Amusing Science

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Or a mini ice age
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Amusing Science

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still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Amusing Science

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Whatever floats your boat? Scientists defy gravity with levitating liquid

Researchers use vibrations to make toy vessels bob about under floating layer of liquid

Scientists have turned the world upside down with a curious quirk of physics that allowed them to float toy boats the wrong way up beneath a levitating body of liquid.

In a striking demonstration of the mind-bending effect, the boats seem to defy the laws of gravity as they bob about on the water above them with their sails pointing down.

The bizarre phenomenon makes for a nifty trick, but researchers say the finding may have practical implications, from mineral processing to separating waste and pollutants from water and other liquids.

“We were playing around,” said Emmanuel Fort, a researcher on the team that discovered the effect at the Higher School of Industrial Physics and Chemistry in Paris. “We had no idea it would work.”

The scientists made their finding while studying the curious impact vibrations can have on the behaviour of liquids. Researchers already knew that, given the right kind of vibrations, bubbles can plunge downwards in liquids, while heavy particles that would normally settle out float to the surface instead.

Another strange effect of vibrations allows a layer of liquid to float in air, provided it is in a closed container. The explanation lies in the ability of vibrations to stabilise what are otherwise unstable systems.
https://www.theguardian.com/science/202 ... ing-liquid for the rest.

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Re: Amusing Science

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Track your location through geological epochs: https://dinosaurpictures.org/ancient-earth#220
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Re: Amusing Science

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Ancient humans had extremely complicated sex lives, evidence shows

Even today's digitally expanded world of modern dating has nothing on the ancient world.

Hundreds of thousands of years ago, there were roughly four species of ancient hominids getting it on with their contemporaries. Thanks to new genetic analysis algorithms, scientists have identified the vestiges of this free-wheeling ancient hookup scene, which lives on inside our DNA.

This includes material from a mysterious "super archaic" ancestor.

Analysis of two Neanderthal genomes, one Denisovan genome, and four modern human genomes revealed new evidence of gene flow between these species, further confirming previous work that suggests that they mated with one another.

The team found that three percent of the Neanderthal genome came from interbreeding with ancient humans. They estimate this intermixing happened between 200,000 and 300,000 years ago — far earlier than previous estimates indicated.

They also found that one percent of the Denisovan genome contained genetic material that came from an unexpected source – an "archaic human ancestor" that was neither human, nor Neanderthal, nor Denisovan.

The authors suggest that 15 percent of genetic regions that came from that archaic ancestor have been passed on to humans today, and there are a few theories as to who it came from and how it got baked into our genetic code.
https://www.inverse.com/science/super-a ... tics-study

The paper: https://journals.plos.org/plosgenetics/ ... en.1008895
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Re: Amusing Science

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Bookmarked
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: Amusing Science

Post by Abdul Alhazred »

Witness wrote: Mon Sep 07, 2020 1:07 am
Ancient humans had extremely complicated sex lives, evidence shows
Just a cute attention grabbing way of framing the observation that ancient humans acted like ... humans. :o
Image "If I turn in a sicko, will I get a reward?"

"Yes! A BIG REWARD!" ====> Click here to turn in a sicko
The arc of the moral universe bends towards chaos.
People who believe God or History are on their side provide the chaos.