Am I a barbarian, or is this stuff junk?

Drama queens must check their tiaras at the door.

Am I a barbarian, or is this stuff junk?

Shemp is a barbarian. His walls are covered with velvet Elvises and dogs playing poker.
6
33%
Shemp is right. The are a lot of crazy rich people who are fooled by junk.
9
50%
Planet X is a work of art in itself!
3
17%
 
Total votes: 18

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Pyrrho
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Post by Pyrrho »

Years ago there was a Cleveland radio personality who set out to make a point. He had some friends over to his house, where he showed them some new paintings by what he described as an up-and-coming new modern artist. They were paintings similar to what Shemp has posted. The man's friends ooohed and aaaahed over the newly discovered masterpieces by the new modern artist...until the radio guy revealed that he had painted them himself in about half an hour or so in his garage by randomly slopping house paint on some canvas. He lost a few friends but made his point extremely well.

Then there was the time when my brother, who is an artist, was moving. He wanted us to be very careful with any of his artwork, and we were. At one point I held up a sheet of masonite which was actually his slopped-up work surface, and asked him, "Do you want this one with the other paintings?" I could have been killed that day... :D
The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus.

Nozomi Kurahashi
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Post by Nozomi Kurahashi »

I will not comment on this art itself. But....

All good art springs from the subconscious (especially abstract), so what is too say that a girl can not have a good connection to her subconscious? Does our connection to our subconscious increase with agee? I think not. Who have better imaginations, children or adults?

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Bottle or the Gun
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Oops! I spilled...that'll be $5000 please....

Post by Bottle or the Gun »

Paintings created by monkeys and elephants in the zoo also sells well, and I can't see the difference between the work done by human or animal artist.

To crib a movie quote: "It looks like Disney threw up"
Tell the story about how God lost his breakfast cereal. Oh wait, that was the Trix rabbit. I get them confused because they are both made up - American Dad

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roger
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Post by roger »

Well, I'll throw in my counter-opinion. I like abstract art a lot. I don't get the issue with the guy who threw some paint on the canvas in 1/2 hour. The canvases looked nice, or they didn't. What does it matter if it was some 'important' artist, or him? You like it, or you don't.

As for this girl's paintings, there's more at http://www.marlaolmstead.com/. Some of it is quite nice, as in *I* like it. We speculated over on JREF that she was "assisted" by her father, as these canvases are rather large and she probably doesn't have the motor control to get the shapes that are on the canvas. But who knows.

Anyway, I like this quite a bit. Call me 'fooled', or ignorant, or whatever, but all I can do is shrug my shoulders. I like to look at it. It has nothing to do with the fact that someone else is paying a lot of money for it - a few of her paintings I really like, others don't move me at all. Just like in an art museum or gallery.

Image


Oh, for the record, I've tried to do abstract art. I can't produce anything I like. I don't think most abstract art requires much in the way of mechanical skill, but I think it requires a good eye. The latter matters to me, not the former.

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Cloverlief
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Post by Cloverlief »

I wouldn't say one was ignorant or even fooled by finding the artwork provided by this child to be visually pleasing. Some of it is very nice indeed and very visually pleasing, and I wouldn't object to hanging such in my home - heck, I have for years, but then I have children. There are quite a few of my kids' artwork that I have considered framing because it was incredibly pleasing to the eye, but is it worth $40,000? By no means.

I think to pay $40,000 for such artwork is a pretensious and silly way to waste money, but hey, it is their money, and they may spend it any way they please. And more power to the child who can make such money for her artwork! Hopefully it will see her into a good school and give her a great start in life.
Chani

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Bottle or the Gun
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Post by Bottle or the Gun »

Do you ever think these guys have Buyer's Remorse? I mean, they congratulate themselves on buying some art and when they get home and hang it up are they are like..."Crap! Was I high or something?"

Maybe that's why so much art is on 'Permanent Loan' to a museum. Nice tax break maybe? I think about all those people who bought expensive Leroy Neman art in the 70's, just to have it cheapened by having prints show up on Burger King placemats, or that Kincade, Painter of Unholy Light crap.
Tell the story about how God lost his breakfast cereal. Oh wait, that was the Trix rabbit. I get them confused because they are both made up - American Dad

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DrMatt
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Post by DrMatt »

I'd just like to say that you're arguing about aesthetic judgements--the realm of beauty--rather than facts--the realm of truth. Beauty is a subjective experience and not really subject to argumentation.
Grayman wrote:If masturbation led to homosexuality you'd think by now I'd at least have better fashion sense.

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Cloverlief
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Post by Cloverlief »

DrMatt wrote:I'd just like to say that you're arguing about aesthetic judgements--the realm of beauty--rather than facts--the realm of truth. Beauty is a subjective experience and not really subject to argumentation.
I'm not sure we are discussing the beauty of the pieces in question - some are quite pleasing aesthetically speaking, but the actual value of said piece considering there are those who obviously are willing to spend $40,000 on something that can be created by the average preschooler with access to a variety of paints, a canvas and some brushes.

I think it leaves the question of what constitutes art? Any flinging of color at a canvas? Or must there be a recognizable figure in the work? And if it is just any flinging of color at a canvas, then why isn't everything art? And why would someone pay $40,000 for random flings of paint on a canvas? Of course it seems that these are eternal questions when it comes to art as it seems (as evidenced by people willing to shell out $40,000 for a preschoolers art work) is very subjective.
Chani

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Bottle or the Gun
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Post by Bottle or the Gun »

DrMatt wrote:I'd just like to say that you're arguing about aesthetic judgements--the realm of beauty--rather than facts--the realm of truth. Beauty is a subjective experience and not really subject to argumentation.
Beauty is Truth, Truth is Beauty. But I'm with Chanileslie.
Tell the story about how God lost his breakfast cereal. Oh wait, that was the Trix rabbit. I get them confused because they are both made up - American Dad

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roger
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Post by roger »

Chani, I would like to see a scan of one of your preschooler's work that is the equal, technically, of the picture I linked to above. For example, look as the yellow and greens, especially in the center panel. The green borders the yellow, giving a very nice luminious effect. And that is just one example. I am not well versed in preschool art projects, but I can't recall seeing anything even remotely similar to this painting.

I don't think I could execute this painting (not that I am a painter).I dunno, maybe it is easier than it looks, and her dad taught her a few tricks that are quite impressive. Maybe load a palette knife with two different colors and smear it around, or something. ???

This is a genuine question, not a "you're wrong, Chani". I hope it comes out that way. :)

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Cloverlief
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Post by Cloverlief »

roger wrote:Chani, I would like to see a scan of one of your preschooler's work that is the equal, technically, of the picture I linked to above. For example, look as the yellow and greens, especially in the center panel. The green borders the yellow, giving a very nice luminious effect. And that is just one example. I am not well versed in preschool art projects, but I can't recall seeing anything even remotely similar to this painting.

I don't think I could execute this painting (not that I am a painter).I dunno, maybe it is easier than it looks, and her dad taught her a few tricks that are quite impressive. Maybe load a palette knife with two different colors and smear it around, or something. ???

This is a genuine question, not a "you're wrong, Chani". I hope it comes out that way. :)
I wish I could, but alas, when I divorced their father, he inherited all their pre-school artwork, and I have not seen any since that time. My daughter did an amazing finger painting that we had framed in our livingroom for years, and my son did a picture entitled "Wading into of Wetlands" when he was about 8 that won an award.

I quite frankly, think that it is a case of having the materials available and possibly her parent limiting her use of colors. But quite frankly, the picture you linked to above reminds me of nothing more than mustard and ketchup smeared on a black background. It appears that the mustard went on first. Quite frankly, I can't see anything original or to indicate that this child has any real talent other than the ability to smear paint on a canvas, and alas, all preschoolers seem to have that ability.

Of course, I will be the first to admit that I find very little of value in abstract art other than pleasing colors (occasionally).
Chani

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Pyrrho
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Post by Pyrrho »

roger wrote:Well, I'll throw in my counter-opinion. I like abstract art a lot. I don't get the issue with the guy who threw some paint on the canvas in 1/2 hour. The canvases looked nice, or they didn't. What does it matter if it was some 'important' artist, or him? You like it, or you don't.

As for this girl's paintings, there's more at http://www.marlaolmstead.com/. Some of it is quite nice, as in *I* like it. We speculated over on JREF that she was "assisted" by her father, as these canvases are rather large and she probably doesn't have the motor control to get the shapes that are on the canvas. But who knows.

Anyway, I like this quite a bit. Call me 'fooled', or ignorant, or whatever, but all I can do is shrug my shoulders. I like to look at it. It has nothing to do with the fact that someone else is paying a lot of money for it - a few of her paintings I really like, others don't move me at all. Just like in an art museum or gallery.

http://www.marlaolmstead.com/images/triptonic.jpg


Oh, for the record, I've tried to do abstract art. I can't produce anything I like. I don't think most abstract art requires much in the way of mechanical skill, but I think it requires a good eye. The latter matters to me, not the former.
That one's actually quite good.
The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus.