Cool astronomy photos

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Fid
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Fid »

That is one of the most beautiful sights I have seen.
... The stars were suns, but so far away they were just little points of light ... The scale of the universe suddenly opened up to me. It was a kind of religious experience. There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me.
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Rob Lister
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Fid wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 6:28 am That is one of the most beautiful sights I have seen.
Only because you're watching it at 10,000 times actual speed. In real time you'd be bored to tears!
:lol:

Lyrid Meteor Shower

The annual Lyrid meteor shower is active each year from about April 16 to 25. In 2020, we expect the shower to pick up beginning late at night on Sunday, April 19, 2020, probably peaking in the predawn hours on Wednesday, April 22. The follow morning (April 23) might be good too, if you’re game. This shower comes after a months-long meteor drought that always falls between early January and April’s Lyrid shower each year. There are no major meteor shower during those months, as you can see by looking at EarthSky’s meteor shower guide. By April, many meteor-watchers are itching to get going! So – though they produce only 10 to 15 meteors per hour at their peak – the Lyrids are always welcome!
https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentia ... eor-shower

I spent an hour (and two cups of coffee) this morning watching between 3 and 4 am on my front porch. Nada. I'm looking SSE so pretty much in the exact wrong direction (Lyra would be NNE). I could sit on my back patio but light pollution in that direction pretty much thwarts that view. Yes, I see the irony ...

"You're looking in the wrong direction!"
"Yea, but I can't see much in the right one."

The paper lady (same one for the last two decades I think) still only has one customer on our court. Bless her heart. She drives about 50 mph down our long cul-de-sac, cigarette in one hand, cell phone in the other (driving with her knee I presume), as she expertly throws the one paper to my neighbor two doors down and across from me. Direct hit right in the center of the driveway. No small feat at that speed; she doesn't even slow down.

I wonder what she saw!
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Rob Lister wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 9:24 am
Fid wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 6:28 am That is one of the most beautiful sights I have seen.
Only because you're watching it at 10,000 times actual speed. In real time you'd be bored to tears!
:lol:...

Indeed sir but I have access to Tree of Life Root (modified) which allows me watch such things as the Shoemaker-Levy impact on Jupiter and a Venus and then a Mercury sun transit in real time via a 20cm (8"for ed) Celestron.

And yeah, for here it's gotta be freezing and nose drying clear to see meteors.
Edit to add. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pak_Protector
... The stars were suns, but so far away they were just little points of light ... The scale of the universe suddenly opened up to me. It was a kind of religious experience. There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me.
Carl Sagan
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Image

Oregon last year. Composite (so basically fake) by Jasman Lion Mander.
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Not PHOTO

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still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Witness wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 12:16 am
Abdul Alhazred wrote: Fri Apr 17, 2020 11:47 am But really not all that messy. :p
I get the (somewhat lame) pun, but think of it: they all orbit the center of gravity but as the cluster is not flattened like a galaxy there is no common plane where they do that. The orbital mechanics must be horrendous – would you want our solar system to be part of that?

From their Wiki page:
The results of N-body simulations have shown that the stars can follow unusual paths through the cluster, often forming loops and often falling more directly toward the core than would a single star orbiting a central mass. In addition, due to interactions with other stars that result in an increase in velocity, some of the stars gain sufficient energy to escape the cluster. Over long periods of time this will result in a dissipation of the cluster, a process termed evaporation. The typical time scale for the evaporation of a globular cluster is 1010 years. In 2010 it became possible to directly compute, star by star, N-body simulations of a globular cluster over the course of its lifetime.
Why are there any globular clusters left anymore then?
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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That has to be wrong
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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But I don’t care enough to look it up
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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It occurred to me that it's probably 1010, not 1010. When you copy and paste, the superscript is lost.

Duh, I get it. That's like 10 billion, fwiw.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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That’s what I thought
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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One could also say nothing is moving

It all depends on where put the camera
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Before you object, something accelerating is considered moving, if it is changing direction

But then it gets real complicated
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Anaxagoras wrote: Sun Apr 26, 2020 12:38 pm It occurred to me that it's probably 1010, not 1010. When you copy and paste, the superscript is lost.

Duh, I get it. That's like 10 billion, fwiw.
Of course. Didn't see that flaw in copy/paste.

The interesting point is that globular clusters are nearly as old as the universe. As we have good theories of stellar evolution that really constrains the cosmological theories, and for some time the problem was that the universe seemed younger than the clusters, which is of course absurd.

But the agreed upon age being now around 13.5 billion years, everything's OK. :)
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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robinson wrote: Sun Apr 26, 2020 8:45 pm something accelerating is considered moving, if it is changing direction
Seems you swapped "moving" and "accelerating".
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Where was that taken?
Yep, you totally outsmarted me ~ Wildcat.

:ball2:

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Hotarubi wrote: Thu Apr 30, 2020 12:50 am Where was that taken?
Point Reyes, CA.
Here's a slightly less cropped version:
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Curiosity's latest drill hole in a rock nicknamed "Edinburgh". The hole is about 0.6 inches (1.6 cm) in diameter and 2 inches (5 cm) deep. This photo was taken by night on 22 March 2020, the surface being lightened by LEDs.

Image
The brave little machine still at it! :)
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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I'd do it
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Rob Lister wrote: Fri May 08, 2020 1:45 am I'd do it
The hole? :shock:
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Just the hole. I'm not a pervert!

Cute, young tourist photographer visits farm in deep south. Sees two young farmers leaning on their fence.

"Hey, can I take your picture?" she asks.

"Well shur," they reply.

She stands there fiddling with her camera for time on end.

"Whut's she doin'?" asked farmer 1 of farmer 2.

"Tryin' to focus," replied farmer2.

Farmer 1 was stunned, "Bofus!?"
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Witness wrote: Fri May 08, 2020 1:49 am
Rob Lister wrote: Fri May 08, 2020 1:45 am I'd do it
The hole? :shock:
Curiosity's already 'ader.

Sloppy seconds?
Such potential!
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice decide to have group sex. But they want it to be safe sex.

Bob has a rubber, and so does Ted. Two rubbers between them.

Is it possible for Bob to fuck both Carol and Alice AND for Ted to fuck both Carol and Alice with just two rubbers if washing the rubbers is not an option?
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Rob Lister wrote: Mon May 11, 2020 1:42 am Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice decide to have group sex. But they want it to be safe sex.

Bob has a rubber, and so does Ted. Two rubbers between them.

Is it possible for Bob to fuck both Carol and Alice AND for Ted to fuck both Carol and Alice with just two rubbers if washing the rubbers is not an option?
This was on one of my third-grade math tests.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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I suppose it depends on what you mean by "safe". It's definitely possible to avoid the risk of either of the women getting pregnant. Just a matter of which hole to fuck.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Spoiler:
Ted r1 > Carol
Ted r1 > r2> Alice
Bob r2 > Alice
Bob r2 > r1 > Carol
You're welcome.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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LOOK: Jupiter hi-res photo captured by astronomers using ‘lucky’ technique

Image

Astronomers have captured one of the highest resolution photos of Jupiter taken from Earth through a technique called “lucky imaging.”

The said technique involves taking “very short” exposure images in infrared of the planet and only using the sharpest ones, when the Earth’s atmosphere is stable. The Gemini Observatory included one of the final images in a statement on its site last Thursday, May 7.

The said picture was made using the Gemini North telescope on Hawaii’s dormant volcano Mauna Kea. It also shows the warm, deep layers of the planet’s atmosphere glowing through its cloud cover, making it appear like a jack-o-lantern.

“The Gemini data were critical because they allowed us to probe deeply into Jupiter’s clouds on a regular schedule,” said Michael Wong of University of California, Berkeley, who led the research team.

He added that the new images rival “the view from space.” The new information also confirmed that the dark spots in Jupiter’s “Great Red Spot” are actually gaps in its cloud cover, and are not caused by cloud color variations.

The images are part of a multi-year program between the observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope to support NASA’s mission to Jupiter called Juno.
https://technology.inquirer.net/99275/l ... -technique
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Comet Swan
VISIBILITY RIGHT NOW [5/13/2]

C/2020 F8 (SWAN) is above the horizon from Greenwich, United Kingdom [change].
It is visible looking in the South direction at an altitude of 59° above the horizon.
Given its current magnitude, C/2020 F8 (SWAN) is easily visible with the help of a small binocular.
See also C/2020 F8 (SWAN) rise and set times.
Go to interactive sky chart
https://theskylive.com/c2020f8-info

Image

I have some binoculars around here somewhere.

Also:
https://twitter.com/c2020f8
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Rob Lister wrote: Wed May 13, 2020 10:20 am Comet Swan
It rains. (And the temperature is down to ~ 10 °C.) :x
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Rob Lister wrote: Mon May 11, 2020 1:42 am Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice decide to have group sex. But they want it to be safe sex.

Bob has a rubber, and so does Ted. Two rubbers between them.

Is it possible for Bob to fuck both Carol and Alice AND for Ted to fuck both Carol and Alice with just two rubbers if washing the rubbers is not an option?
Of course. Especially if one is unconcerned about Carol and Alice continued good health. They won't get preggers, but they may come down with the assorted nasty rashes and occasional outbreaks, etc. provided Bob and Ted aren't the only men Carol or Alice have been fucking in an unprotected fashion. :)
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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This Citizen Science Gig Pays People to Match Space Photos

Astronomers at the Hubble Image Similarity Project are employing their out-of-work neighbors to help them train a neural net to recognize celestial objects.

Image

...

Griffith, thus underemployed, perked up right away when her friend Jonathan Obermaier, furloughed from a local brewery, pointed her to a gig on their Hampden neighborhood Facebook page: Astronomers from the Space Telescope Science Institute, just down the road, wanted to pay out-of-work service professionals like her to analyze images from Hubble, Earth’s most iconic telescope. The analyzers would pore over pretty pictures and determine how similar they were to each other for about $1,500, at a rate of around $20 per hour. It’s called the Hubble Image Similarity Project.

...

And they are doing something for her in return—paying her. That’s in contrast with most citizen science projects, which rely on volunteers. It was a very conscious choice for the institute’s astronomers, as cutting paychecks has to be. Joshua Peek and Rick White, the scientists who founded this project, saw so many of their neighbors suddenly without incomes that they wanted to help out. Their own careers and funding are more insulated from the immediate economics of Covid-19, and the astronomers saw an opportunity to create short-term work for others while helping themselves.

Peek—whose family helped organize their block’s pandemic mutual aid group—felt like the aphorism “Think globally; act locally” applied to this situation too. So, for cosmic mutual aid, he says, instead of turning to the whole internet—where most citizen science work is sourced—he turned to his neighbors, “rather than people who are anonymous around the world.”
https://www.wired.com/story/this-citize ... ce-photos/

For the curious, the globular cluster in the article is NGC 1466. Details here: Hubble Explores the Formation and Evolution of Star Clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Everything in the Solar System: https://i.redd.it/zvbij5ozx0251.png (big graphic, you'll have to click)
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Really makes it look like the Death Star took out a planet between Mars and Jupiter, don't it?
Such potential!
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Image
It's actually called the Seagull Nebula, but so many people say it looks like the Phoenix.

IC 2177 is an H II region of nebulosity centered on the Be star HD 53367. This nebula was discovered by Welsh amateur astronomer Isaac Roberts and was described by him as "pretty bright, extremely large, irregularly round, very diffuse."

It is 3,600 light years from Earth.

This nebula is captured with narrowband filters to help battle against light pollution in the Detroit area and processed in the Hubble Palette.
Source & technical details: https://old.reddit.com/r/interestingasf ... ix_nebula/
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness »

Image
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by robinson2 »

And atmosphere
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by robinson »

Stop stealing my lines
still working on Sophrosyne, but I will no doubt end up with Hubris
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

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Abdul Alhazred wrote: Sat Jun 06, 2020 1:20 pm France has better wine.
Italians grow wine grapes on an old volcano: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aglianico_del_Vulture.

I recommend. :)