Christmas Dinner

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ed
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by ed »

Pyrrho wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:45 pm
ed wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 1:24 am Weiners.

Two of them.
Broiled...none of this newfangled microwave thing.
So then would it be fair to say that you mike multiple weiners, both on the dark side, "served" simultaneously?
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asthmatic camel
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by asthmatic camel »

ed wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:30 pm
shuize wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 1:18 pm
ed wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 1:01 pm We here forget that the war was different for you all, both of them. We forget (or never knew) how desperate it was. I recall visiting a little cemetery in Scotland, must have been outside of Inverness somewhere. My wife said something like "gosh, all these people died on the same day". I pointed out that it was a day during the Somme offensive. All the Pals. Can you imagine what it was like in that village? Really inutterably sad.

Perhaps a difference in degree but not so much in kind.

See, for example, the Sullivan brothers:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sullivan_brothers
I'm familiar with their story.

I think that the difference in degree is orders of magnitude and that makes it a difference in kind. (<---n.b. quotable)

My experience in talking with Brits (YMMV) is that it is still a close in thing with them. Very close, like intimate.
Many of these locally raised battalions suffered heavy casualties during the Somme offensives of 1916. A notable example was the 11th (Service) Battalion (Accrington), East Lancashire Regiment, better known as the Accrington Pals. The Accrington Pals were ordered to attack Serre, the most northerly part of the main assault, on the opening day of the battle. The Accrington Pals were accompanied by Pals battalions drawn from Sheffield, Leeds, Barnsley, and Bradford.[4] Of an estimated 700 Accrington Pals who took part in the attack, 235 were killed and 350 wounded within the space of twenty minutes.[5] Despite repeated attempts, Serre was not taken until February 1917, at which time the German Army had evacuated to the Hindenburg Line.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pals_battalion

They really lost a generation of young men.
My parents grew up during WW2 and my grandparents lived through both. Although I wasn't born until 1965, the effects were still being felt and the air raid sirens were still regularly tested when I was a young man. Yeah, it's still close for many who are alive today. At least we were never invaded: our losses were dwarfed by those elsewhere. Russia lost millions of troops in both wars and many millions more civilians died. Grim times indeed.
Shit happens. The older you get, the more often shit happens. So you have to try not to give a shit even when you do. Because, if you give too many shits, you've created your own shit creek and there's no way out other than swimming through the shit. Oh, and fuck.
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ed
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by ed »

You know, AC, the thing that really drove what happened to england home to me was on my first visit to London. We were walking to the Houses of Parliament and saw pock marks on the wall. A helpful Bobbie explained that that was from shrapnel from the bombing.

To see that in a modern city was sobering. That replaced 50 books on the Blitz.
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asthmatic camel
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by asthmatic camel »

My cellar is an air raid shelter! My grandfather built warplanes at Fairey's, Heaton Chapel, about a mile away, and the Luftwaffe bombed the crap out of Manchester during WWII in an attempt to hit it and other heavy industries. Stockport Air Raid Shelters, about a mile of tunnels in the town centre, is now open to the public.

I remember asking my mother why some of the trees on the road where I grew up had white rings painted on them. "So people could see them during the blackout." came the reply. They're still just about visible now.

And we very nearly lost. Both times. That's sobering.
Shit happens. The older you get, the more often shit happens. So you have to try not to give a shit even when you do. Because, if you give too many shits, you've created your own shit creek and there's no way out other than swimming through the shit. Oh, and fuck.
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ed
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by ed »

Damn right.
But you had Churchill.
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Pyrrho
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by Pyrrho »

Churchill visited Cleveland once. Gave a lecture. There's a painting hanging in one of the hotels...depicting him looking out over city not unlike New York City, which according to the plaque next to it, was something he said at the time, to the effect that he foresaw Cleveland becoming a magnificent, teeming metropolis.

Can't find it on the web. There's a quote from his lecture though:

"We are stripped bare by the curse of plenty."
Sir Winston Churchill, Lecture, Cleveland, Ohio, February 3, 1932
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Rob Lister
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by Rob Lister »

Okay guys. Let's not let Hitler fuck up christmas dinner.
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Witness
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by Witness »

asthmatic camel wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 12:50 pm I suspect the calumny originated with American GIs returning from Britain after WWs I & II when food was strictly rationed.
The French also have a very dim view of British cuisine, especially "boiled mutton in mint sauce", whatever that is.
Myself, I enjoyed eating in London, in part as you can taste foods from the whole (* trumpets *) Empire.

The Shetlands were nice too. I spent some days in a B&B where a… ahem… quite rotund lady busied herself all day in the kitchen, then, when we were as full as eggs, sent her husband and yours truly to the nearby (that's relative: a mile hike in refreshing Scottish weather) pub with the reminder to "be good boys". :)
shuize
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by shuize »

ed wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:30 pm I'm familiar with their story.

I think that the difference in degree is orders of magnitude and that makes it a difference in kind. (<---n.b. quotable)

My experience in talking with Brits (YMMV) is that it is still a close in thing with them. Very close, like intimate.

...

They really lost a generation of young men.

Yes. I suspect it was similar for us during the Civil War when they recruited units locally.

There are lots of similarities between WWI and the Civil War (local recruitment, large casualty numbers, early trench/siege warfare, mining/underground bombing operations, spotter blimps, early machine guns, etc.).

But everyone who lived though those losses are now gone, too.
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asthmatic camel
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by asthmatic camel »

Witness wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 10:28 pm
asthmatic camel wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 12:50 pm I suspect the calumny originated with American GIs returning from Britain after WWs I & II when food was strictly rationed.
The French also have a very dim view of British cuisine, especially "boiled mutton in mint sauce", whatever that is.
Myself, I enjoyed eating in London, in part as you can taste foods from the whole (* trumpets *) Empire.

The Shetlands were nice too. I spent some days in a B&B where a… ahem… quite rotund lady busied herself all day in the kitchen, then, when we were as full as eggs, sent her husband and yours truly to the nearby (that's relative: a mile hike in refreshing Scottish weather) pub with the reminder to "be good boys". :)
Boiled mutton/lamb is used to make Cawl, probably the Welsh national dish and Lancashire Hotpot, popular in these parts. Neither contains mint, although roasted lamb is traditionally served with mint sauce. There's nothing wrong with any of them, so the French can go fuck themselves. :D
Shit happens. The older you get, the more often shit happens. So you have to try not to give a shit even when you do. Because, if you give too many shits, you've created your own shit creek and there's no way out other than swimming through the shit. Oh, and fuck.
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Witness
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by Witness »

So very similar to Irish stew.

During my first travel in Ireland I wanted the impossible: having an Irish stew with a pint of Guinness. Apparently you could only combine it with wine. :?
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Abdul Alhazred
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by Abdul Alhazred »

Uh oh.

Is it Irish, Welsh, or Lancastrian?

Time for a few decades of terrorism to decide the issue. :notsure:
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Bananas?-Yes
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Re: Christmas Dinner

Post by Bananas?-Yes »

shuize wrote: Fri Dec 27, 2019 11:38 pm
. . . truncated . . .

Yes. I suspect it was similar for us during the Civil War when they recruited units locally.

There are lots of similarities between WWI and the Civil War (local recruitment, large casualty numbers, early trench/siege warfare, mining/underground bombing operations, spotter blimps, early machine guns, etc.).

But everyone who lived though those losses are now gone, too.
Actually, the American Civil War is considered by professionals a turning point in the art of such style of warfare.

You pointed to many changes, but one big one you left out -- President Lincoln ran a whole bunch of that conflict using a new style of communications room. I mean, his generals were actually doing some mighty stupid things in the early days and President Lincoln became a hands-on CINC. Funny, too, the history books when I was in my younger days didn't seem to cover that much. I learned about that when I was a WOC.

I also learned that about halfway through the war a number of European types showed up to watch the goings on. They also realized that changes were in the air in that art form. And as strange as that may read, making war is an art form.

Sorry, this is supposed to be about Christmas dinner, eh? That would be the mess hall. Or the field kitchen.
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